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things which are desirable and advantageous. We may use all lawful means to acquire it, and to secure its continuance; and if we be careful and industrious in using the proper means, we have commonly a fair prospect of succeeding. The caprice of the great and powerful cannot deprive us of this reward at least. They can neither give it, nor take it away; and it is very well for the world that they cannot. The love of reputation, when directed by reason, is allowable ; but reason must govern, and not be governed. Our love of it must be moderate: we must love it as a thing which, though pleasant and profitable, is precarious, attended with some inconveniencies, not easily kept, and sometimes undeservedly lost, and lastly of no use to us beyond the grave. We, whose continuance here is so short, are scarcely born for this world, or for any thing that this world can bestow. Our reputation we can enjoy no longer than whilst we live. A reputation after death, if it only begins then, is of small value; it is like a favourable wind after a shipwreck. When we go hence, what good can arise to our own persons from it? Here we must leave it, and here it will remain and survive for a greater or a lesser number of years, as time and chance shall determine.

Good actions are a treasure which we can carry hence with us. If we are secure of these, it is no matter if the world be negligent of us, and we pass our days unregarded, and posterity know not that ever we

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had a being. Our virtues are immortal, and true honour will be their recompense, an honour which we shall receive from God, from holy angels, and from just men made perfect, and which shall continue to all eternity. And this seems to suggest one reason for which we should have some taste, and entertain some value for reputation here, because reputation may be part of our reward hereafter.

DISSERTATION V.

ON THE HISTORY AND THE CHARACTER OF BALAAM.

AT VERI FRUSTRA IMPATIENS, ET MENTIS INIQUÆ, LUCTATUR VATES, MAGNUM SI PECTORE POSSIT EXCUSSISse deum. TANTO MAGIS ILLE FATIGAT

OS RABIDUM, FERA CORDA DOMANS, FINGITQUE PREMENDO.

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