Gay's Beggar's Opera: Its Content, History & Influence

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Page 3 - We were all, at the first night of it, in great uncertainty of the event; till we were very much encouraged by overhearing the duke of Argyle, who sat in the next box to us, say,' It will do ; it must do! I see it in the eyes of them.
Page 251 - Of this performance, when it was printed, the reception was different, according to the different opinion of its readers. Swift commended it for the excellence of its morality, as a piece that " placed all kinds of vice in the strongest and most odious light ;" but others, and among them Dr.
Page 165 - Since laws were made for every degree, to curb vice in others as well as in me — and so forth you know — doesn't it strike you in that light?
Page 199 - Parting with him! why that is the whole scheme and intention of all marriage articles. The comfortable estate of widowhood is the only hope that keeps up a wife's spirits.
Page 338 - Love! ye do me wrong To cast me off discourteously; And I have loved you so long, Delighting in your company.
Page 165 - Through all the employments of life, Each neighbour abuses his brother ; Whore and rogue, they call husband and wife : All professions be-rogue one another. The priest calls the lawyer a cheat : ( The lawyer be-knaves the divine : ! And the statesman, because he's so great, Thinks his trade as honest as mine.
Page 164 - He began on it ; and when first he mentioned it to Swift, the Doctor did not much like the project. As he carried it on, he showed what he wrote to both of us, and we now and then gave a correction, or a word or two of advice ; but it was wholly of his own writing. When it was done, neither of us thought it would succeed. We showed it to Congreve ; who, after reading it over, said, it would either take greatly, or be damned confoundedly.
Page 344 - I suppose Mr Gay will return from the Bath with twenty pounds more flesh and two hundred less in money : Providence never designed him to be above two-and-twenty by his thoughtlessness and Gullibility.
Page 333 - twas Claver'se who spoke, 'Ere the King's crown shall fall there are crowns to be broke, So let each Cavalier who loves honour and me, Come follow the bonnet of Bonny Dundee, 'Come fill up my cup, come fill up my can, Come saddle your horses, and call up your men; Come open the West Port, and let me gang free, And it's room for the bonnets of Bonny Dundee!
Page 334 - Of all the girls that are so smart There's none like pretty Sally ; She is the darling of my heart, And she live'a in our alley.