Gleanings Through Wales, Holland, and Westphalia;: With Views of Peace and War at Home and Abroad ...

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Page 326 - All the performances of human art, at which we look with praise or wonder, are instances of the resistless force of perseverance; it is by this that the quarry becomes a pyramid, and that distant countries are united with canals.
Page 222 - Twelve at noon was the hour, and exactly as the clock in my room struck it, he entered ; the wet, for it rained torrents, dripping from every part of his dress like water from a sheep just landed from its washing. He would not even have attended to his situation, having sat himself down with the utmost composure and begun conversation, had...
Page 355 - I pity the man who can travel from Dan. to Beersheba, and cry, 'Tis all barren and so it is; and so is all the world to him, who will not cultivate the fruits it offers.
Page 222 - You, like the rest of my friends, throw away your pity upon my supposed hardships with just as much reason as you commiserate the common beggars, who, being familiar with storms...
Page 24 - To them his heart, his love, his griefs were given, But all his ferious thoughts had reft in Heaven. As fome tall cliff that lifts its awful form, Swells from the vale, and midway leaves the ftorm, Tho' round its breaft the rolling clouds are fpread, Eternal funfhine fettles on its head.
Page 220 - ... and invigorated, as he faid, beyond meafure. He never put on a great coat in the coldeft countries; nor had been a minute under or over the time of an appointment, fo far as it depended on himfelf, for fix and tw.enty years. He never continued at a place, or with a perfon, a fingle day beyond the period...
Page 116 - By no means; if they cannot boast the voluptuous languors of an Italian sky, they glow with the bracing spirit of a more invigorating atmosphere. I really took some pains to investigate this curious custom, and after being assured, by many, of its veracity, had an opportunity of...
Page 231 - ... in the world ; namely, my having no manner of claim to it. What I do, have done, or may hereafter do, is, has been, and will always be, matter of inclination, the gratifying which always pays...
Page 227 - My ease, vivacity, and spirits, augmented. My clothing, &c. underwent a similar reform ; the effect of all which is, and has been for many years, that I am neither affected by seeing my carriage dragged up a mountain, or driven down a valley. If an accident happens, I am prepared for it...
Page 226 - I had long indulged. But as it is always much harder to get rid of a bad habit than to contract it, I entered on my reform gradually ; that is to say, I began to diminish my usual indulgences by degrees.

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