The World's Famous Orations, Volume 4

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Page 137 - ... accepted time, now, in this your day of salvation, take counsel, not of prejudice, not of party spirit, not of the ignominious pride of a fatal consistency, but of history, of reason, of the ages which are past, of the signs of this most portentous time. Pronounce in a manner worthy of the expectation with which this great debate has been anticipated, and of the long remembrance which it will leave behind. Renew the youth of the State.
Page 80 - Did Milton understand those mythologies? — Was he less versed than Mr. Paine in the superstitions of the world? No, — they were the subject of his immortal song; and though shut out from all recurrence to them, he poured them forth from the stores of a memory rich with all that man ever knew, and laid them in their order as the illustration of...
Page 81 - Thus you find all that is great, or wise, or splendid, or illustrious, amongst created beings ; — all the minds gifted beyond ordinary nature, if not inspired by its universal Author for the advancement and dignity of the world, though divided by distant ages, and by clashing opinions, yet joining as it were in one sublime chorus, to celebrate the truths of Christianity, and laying upon its holy altars the neverfading offerings of their immortal wisdom. Against all this concurring testimony, we...
Page 81 - The secrets of th' abyss to spy. He pass'd the flaming bounds of place and time: The living Throne, the sapphire-blaze, Where Angels tremble while they gaze, He saw ; but blasted with excess of light, Closed his eyes in endless night.
Page 198 - For while we have seen, as stated by the right hon. Baronet, the political earthquake rocking Europe from side to side — while we have seen thrones shaken, shattered, levelled, institutions overthrown and destroyed — while in almost every country of Europe the conflict of civil war has deluged the land with blood, from the Atlantic to the Black Sea, from the Baltic to the Mediterranean, this country has presented a spectacle honourable to the people of England, and worthy of the admiration of...
Page 200 - England ; and whether, as the Roman in days of old held himself free from indignity when he could say ' Civis Romanus sum,' so also a British subject, in whatever land he may be, shall feel confident that the watchful eye and the strong arm of England will protect him against injustice and wrong.
Page 125 - The consequence of letting loose the passions at present chained and confined would be to produce a scene of desolation which no man can contemplate without horror ; and I should not sleep easy on my couch if I were conscious that I had contributed to precipitate it by a single moment. This...
Page 77 - How any man can rationally vindicate the publication of such a book, in a country where the Christian religion is the very foundation of the law of the land, I am totally at a loss to conceive, and have no ideas for the discussion of.
Page 134 - The question of Parliamentary reform is still behind. But signs, of which it is impossible to misconceive the import, do most clearly indicate that, unless that question also be speedily settled, property, and order, and all the institutions of this great monarchy will be exposed to fearful peril. Is it possible that gentlemen long versed in high political affairs cannot read these signs? Is it possible that they can really believe that the representative system of England, such as it now is, will...
Page 85 - Gentlemen, the real prosecutor is the master of the greatest empire the civilized world ever saw. The defendant is a defenceless proscribed exile. He is a French royalist, who fled from his country in the autumn of 1792...

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