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Books Books 1 - 10 of 10 on For what purpose make a partition of goods, where every one has already more than....
" For what purpose make a partition of goods, where every one has already more than enough? Why give rise to property, where there cannot possibly be any injury? Why call this object mine... "
The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World - Page 44
by Owen Flanagan - 2009 - 304 pages
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Essays and treatises on several subjects

David Hume - 1809
...that, in such a happy state, every other social virtue would flourish, and receive tenfold increase ; but the cautious, jealous virtue of justice, would...the seizing of it by another, I need but stretch out niy hand to possess mysejf of what is equally valuable ? Justice, in that case, being totally USELESS,...
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An inquiry concerning human understanding. A dissertation on the passions ...

David Hume - English essays - 1825
...that, in such a happy state, every other social virtue would flourish, and receive tenfold increase ; but the cautious, jealous virtue of justice, would...possess myself of what is equally valuable ? Justice, irv that case, being totally USELESS, would be an idle ceremonial, and could never possibly have place...
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History of Moral Science

Robert Blakey - Ethics - 1833
...property, where there cannot possibly be any injury ? Why call this object mine, when, upon the seizing it by another, I need but stretch out my hand to possess...that case, being totally USELESS, would be an idle ceremony, and could never possibly have place in the catalogue of virtues." •Mli, The origin of society,...
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Biographies of Ancient and Modern Celebrated Freethinkers: Reprinted from an ...

Charles Bradlaugh, Anthony Collins, John Watts - Rationalists - 1871 - 344 pages
...rise to property, where there cannot possibly be any injuiy? Why call this object mine, when, upon seizing of it by another, I need but stretch out my...myself of what is equally valuable? Justice, in that caHe, being totally useless, would be an idle ceremonial, and could never possibly have place in the...
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Extraterrestrials

E. Regis - Science - 1987 - 278 pages
...dreamed of. For what purpose make a partition of goods where everyone has already more than enough? . . . Why call this object mine when, upon the seizing of...hand to possess myself of what is equally valuable?' (ibid. p. 15.) 4. This has, indeed, already been argued, and by myself at that. In a portion of a lengthy...
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Religion and Morality

Avi Sagi, Abraham Sagi, Daniel Statman - Religion - 1995 - 188 pages
...in circumstances of unlimited abundance, the institution of property has no place. In Hume's words: Why give rise to property, where there cannot possibly...hand to possess myself of what is equally valuable?. . . . We see, even in the present necessitous condition of mankind, that, wherever any benefit is bestowed...
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Health Care and the Ethics of Encounter: A Jewish Discussion of Social Justice

Laurie Zoloth - Religion - 1999 - 323 pages
...justice would never once be dreamed of. For what purpose make a partition of goods, where everyone has already more than enough? Why give rise to property,...another, I need but stretch out my hand to possess myself what is equally valuable? . . . We see, even in the present necessitous condition of mankind, that,...
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The Classical Moralists: Selections Illustrating Ethics from Socrates to ...

Benjamin Rand - Philosophy - 2004 - 820 pages
...that, in such a happy state, every other social virtue would flourish, and receive tenfold increase; but the cautious, jealous virtue of justice would...the seizing of it by another, I need but stretch out mv hand to possess myself of what is equally valuable? Justice, in that case, being totally useless,...
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Early Responses to Hume's Moral, Literary & Political Writings

James Fieser - Philosophy - 2005 - 819 pages
...property, where there cannot possibly be any injury? Why call this object mine, when, upon the seizing it by another, I need but stretch out my hand to possess...that case, being totally USELESS, would be an idle ceremony, and could never possibly have place in the catalogue of virtues." 4th, The origin of society,...
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An Inquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals

David Hume - Philosophy - 2006 - 176 pages
...enough? Why give rise to property, where there cannot possibly be any injury? Why call this object mint, when upon the seizing of it by another, I need but stretch out my hand to possess myself to what is equally valuable? Justice, in that case, being totally useless, would be an idle ceremonial,...
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