Latin Exercises

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Crocker and Brewster, 1847 - Latin language - 336 pages
 

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Page 322 - Tyrrhenum : sapias, vina liques, et spatio brevi Spem longam reseces. Dum loquimur, fugerit invida Aetas : carpe diem, quam minimum credula...
Page 142 - ... this man alone is removed from this piratical crew, we may appear, perhaps, for a short time relieved from fear and anxiety, but the danger will settle down and lie hid in the veins and bowels of the republic. As it often happens that men afflicted with a severe disease, when they are tortured...
Page 92 - The name of a town (91) where any thing is or is done, if of the first or second declension, and singular number, is put in the genitive ! otherwise, in the ablative ; eg, 1.
Page 299 - Not if I had a hundred tongues, and a hundred mouths, And a voice of iron, could I mention all the species of crimes, Nor enumerate all the names of their punishments.
Page 277 - HEXAMETER. The Hexameter or heroic verse consists of six feet. Of these the fifth is a dactyle, and the sixth a spondee ; all the rest may be either dactyles or spondees ; as, Ludere I quffi veluUu dumRe lm cala- I mo per- I mst - I gristl.
Page 25 - A noun in the predicate, after a verb neuter or passive, is put in the same case as the subject, when it denotes the same person or thing ; as, Ira furor brevis est, Anger is a short madness.
Page 167 - A noun and a participle are put in the ablative, called absolute, to denote the time, cause or concomitant of an action, or the condition on which it depends...

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