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HERE never was, perhaps, an apology for the subje£t and arrangement of a Work more necesary than on the presint occasion: The

volume we now lay before the Public is a book of VARIATIONS, and contains, probably, more information than instruction. The occurrences recorded are fingular and curious; whimsical, serious, and ridiculous; a broken narrative, yet we presume to say, a regular history. The reader, however, on considering the subject, will

, we hipe, excuse the medley afpearance it makes.-KING, Lords, and Commons-Majorities, Minorities, Debates, and Dissolution, in SUPERIOR TYPĚ. Westminster Meetings, Quarrels, Negotiations, Advertisements, Hand Bills, &c. &c. &c. mobbing it along in small and crouded letter. In the midst the GREAT SEAL is held up, and claims the reader's notice. Next, Mr. Pitt and Grocers Hall

, feasting and parade, with other illustrious matter of this kind. A fucceeding page introduces HOOD and WRAY, Covent Garden, and Confusion then FOX, MAN OF THE PEOPLE, and men of various descriptions ; Constables, Justices of Peace, Armed Force, and Murder ! Paragraph follows next, serious and comic ; point and counter-point; Hood and Wray, Versus Fox and Laurel. Following the Laurel, not unhappily indeed, the Muses with her waiting maids, comes forward and closes the procession. Here we may aptly inforin the reader, that in the poetical part of our miscellany, he will find by the production, that sometimes the Muse herself composed, and sometimes one or more of her humble attendants. Indeed, in revising our collection in form, we discover here and there certain appearances that give us reason to sufpeet some of these attendants to be no other than scullion-boys in disguise, who, possibly having an intrigue with those a little above them in situation, had formed the desperate plan of Nipping on a female drefs over their own dirty linen, and most gallantly determined to follow their mistrelles in this expedition from Parnasus, even unto the “ Place of Cabbages. serious, we are afraid that many will think our Covent Garden something like its great prototype, not so clean swept as it ought to be.--In truib, we are far from being fatisfied in this respect: We can, notwithstanding, asure the reader, that we commenced our work with a determined refolu

tion

To be

66

tion of weeding out every obnoxious plant, nor have we spared great pains to effect our purpose. If, after all, the reader Nould find objectionable matter, we hope he will shew a little candour, and reflect, how imperceptibly we might be led astray from our original design of elegant selection. 6 Evil communication (be will be pleased to remember) cor

rupteth good manners," and we may truly say that we have been obliged to keep bad company. Under the necesity of treading dirty ground, no wonder some of the joil should

stick to our feet. Our late compiling situation

may be compared, as to its effects on the mental faculties, with those of the chymist, as to smelling. At the outset of his business he feels incommoded with the fumes of his füill ;-a few days pass, and it becomes less intolerable ;-—a few more, he hardly is sensible of inconvenience ;-at last the time arrives, when he endures the opposite of sweet as well as sweet itself, and is surprized when told by a stranger, that his ihop is disagreeable. This may prove to be our case. We at first, indignant, threw away. composition unfit for the public eye, and continued fo to do (in our apprehenfion at least) all through the l ork; yet not unlikely the stranger, on visiting our shop, will complain that he cannot bear it, and leave us in disguft. Be this as it may, at the moment we write our apology, we are sensible it is too late to repent; the book is printed, and must now take it's chance. We intended not to offend, and fall deeply regret the occafion, if offence, either againf Justice or Delicacy, be attributed to premeditated desgn. The errors of the head claim to be forgiven, when depravity at the heart finds not an habitation. In the selection made of the Caricature Prints, regard to Decency has entirely guided us. To those who may cavil at our apparent partiality in giving to the public such alone as principally tend to ridicule the opponents of Mr. Fox, and so few against him, we shortly reply, that the indelicacy with which the partizans of Hood and Wray conjtantly thought proper to display their ideas, 'ender their productions unfit for the public eye, and would disgrace our Work if inserted in it. But yet another objection arises.The designs of the least indelicate are universally puerile and ridiculous ;--the fatire intended appears obscure, or, if found out at all, is flat and inapplicable. We boldly asert this as the truth, and duubt not but the artist at least, if not the public in general, will acquit us of party prejudice in this refpečt. Our readers will perceive the subjects of those given are various and pointed; many of them were published pending the Election, and some previous to that time. All, however, without exception, have relation to occurrences that come within the limits of our history. The paragraphical

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