A History of England from the Earliest Times to the Death of Queen Victoria

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Scott, Foresman, 1901 - Great Britain - 1100 pages
 

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Page 523 - ... had I but served God as diligently as I have served the king, he would not have given me over in my gray hairs.
Page 600 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them ; they looked like anatomies of death, they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 934 - If I were an American as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms — never, never, never!
Page 636 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England...
Page 931 - I rejoice that America has resisted. Three millions of people, so dead to all the feelings of liberty as voluntarily to submit to be slaves, would have been fit instruments to make slaves of the rest.
Page 636 - England; and that the arduous and urgent affairs concerning the king, state and defence of the realm and of the church of England, and the maintenance and making of laws and redress of mischiefs and grievances which daily happen within this realm, are proper subjects and matter of counsel and debate in Parliament...
Page 698 - That it was our duty, if ever the Lord brought us back again in peace, to call Charles Stuart, that man of blood, to an account for that blood he had shed, and mischief he had done to his utmost, against the Lord's Cause and People in these poor Nations.
Page 741 - that according to the ancient and fundamental laws of this Kingdom, the government is, and ought to be, by King, Lords, and Commons.
Page 579 - Be of good comfort, for we shall this day light such a candle in England as, I trust, by God's grace, shall never be put out.
Page 77 - Alfred was the noblest as he was the most complete embodiment of all that is great, all that is lovable, in the English temper. He combined as no other man has ever combined its practical energy, its patient and enduring force, its profound sense of duty, the reserve and self-control that...

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