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THE

SECOND DEFENCE

OF THE

PEOPLE OF ENGLAND,

AGAINST

AN ANONYMOUS LIBEL

ENTITLED

6S THE ROYAL BLOOD CRYING TO HEAVEN FOR VEN

GEANCE ON THE ENGLISH PARRICIDES.”

TRANSLATED FROM THE LATIN,

BY ROBERT FELLOWES, A. M. Oxon.

A GRATEFUL recollection of the divine goodness, is . the first of human obligations; and extraordinary Favours demand more folemn and devout acknowledgments; with such acknowledgments I feel it my duty to begin this work. First, because I was born at a time, when the virtue of my fellow-citizens, far exceeding that of their progenitors in greatness of soul and vigour of enterprize, having invoked heaven to witness the justice of their cause, and been clearly governed by its directions, has succeeded in delivering the commonwealth from the most grievous tyranny, and religion from the most igno. minious degradation. And next, because when there suddenly arose many who, as is usual with the vulgar, bafely calumniated the most illustrious atchievements, and when one eminent above the rest, inflated with literary pride, and the zealous applauses of his partizans, had in a scandalous publication, which was particularly levelled

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against me, nefariously undertaken to plead the cause of despotism, I who was neither deemed unequal to so renowned an adversary, nor to so great a subject, was particularly felected by the deliverers of our country, and by the general suffrage of the public, openly to vindicate the rights of the English nation, and consequently of liberty itself. Lastly, because in a matter of so much moment, and which excited such ardent, expectations, I did not disappoint the hopesi nor" the opinions of my fellowcitizens; while men of learning and eminence abroad, "honoured me with unmingled approbation; while I obtained such a victory over my opponent, that notwithstanding his unparalleled assurance, he was obliged to quit, the field with his courage broken and his reputation lost; and for the three years which he lived afterwards, much as he menaced and furiously as he raved, he gave me no farther trouble, except that he procurad the paltry aid of fome despicable hirelings, and suborned fome of his filly and extravagant admirers to support him under the weight of the unexpeded and recent disgrace, which he had experienced. This will immediately appear, Such are the signal favours which I afcribe to the divine beneficence, and which I thought it right“ devoutly to commemorate, not only that I might discharge a debt of gratitude, but particularly because they feein auspicious to the success of my present undertaking. For who is there, who does not identify the honoựr of his country with his own ? And what can conduce fiore to the beauty or glory of one's country, than the recovery, not only of its civil but its religious liberty?. And whať ration or ftate ever obtained both, by more successful or more valorous exertion? For fortitude is seen resplendent, not only in the field of battle and amid the clash of arms, but diiplays its energy under every difficulty and against every assailant. Those Greeks and Romans, who are the objects of our admiration, employed hardly any other virtue in the extirpation of tyrants, than that love of liberty which made them prompt in seizing the sword and gave them strength to use it. With facility thef accomplished the undertaking, amid the general shout of praile and joy; nor did they engage in the attempt so much,

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