The Works of Lord Bolingbroke: With a Life, Volume 1

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Page 80 - AWAKE, my St John ! leave all meaner things To low ambition, and the pride of kings. Let us (since life can little more supply Than just to look about us and to die) Expatiate free o'er all this scene of Man ; A mighty maze ! but not without a plan ; A wild, where weeds and flowers promiscuous shoot ; Or garden, tempting with forbidden fruit.
Page 76 - I think Mr. St. John the greatest - -young man I ever knew; wit, capacity, beauty, quickness of apprehension, good learning, and an excellent taste; the best orator in the house of commons, admirable conversation, good nature, and good manners; generous, and a despiser of money.
Page 16 - and desire of knowledge, were what I felt all my life : and though my genius, unlike the demon of Socrates, whispered so softly, that very often I heard him not in the hurry of those passions with which I was transported, yet some calmer hours there were, and in them I hearkened to him.
Page 56 - Parties; and of all his masterly pieces it is in general esteemed the best. Having finished this, which was received with the utmost avidity, he resolved to take leave not only of his enemies and friends, but even of his country; and in this resolution, in the year 1736...
Page 51 - I am then, two-thirds restored, my person safe, (unless I meet hereafter with harder treatment than even that of Sir Walter Raleigh) and my estate, with all the other property I have acquired, or may acquire, secured to me. But the attainder is kept carefully and prudently in force, lest so corrupt a member should come again into the house of lords, and his bad leaven should sour that sweet, untainted mass.
Page 87 - Signed, sealed, published, and declared by the said testator, as and for his last will and testament, in the presence of OLIVER PRICE and THOMAS HALL.
Page 419 - That as to dispute what God may do is blasphemy, ... so is it sedition in subjects to dispute what a king may do in the height of his power.
Page 23 - ... at in a man of his temper was his prodigious application whenever he thought it necessary; for he would plod whole days and nights like the lowest clerk in an office. His talent of speaking in public, for which he was so very much celebrated, I know nothing of except from the informations of others; but understanding men of both parties have assured me that, in this point, in their memory and judgment, he was never equalled.
Page 52 - I can answer that (for one whole day) we have had nothing for dinner but mutton-broth, beans and bacon, and a barn-door fowl. Now his lordship is run after his cart, I have a moment left to myself to tell you that I overheard him yesterday agree with a painter for 200 to paint his country-hall with trophies of rakes, spades, prongs, &c., and other ornaments, merely to countenance his calling this place a farm — now turn over a new leaf.
Page 52 - I now hold the pen for my Lord Bolingbroke, who is reading your letter between two hay-cocks; but his -attention is somewhat diverted, by casting his eyes on the clouds, not in...

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