A History of the British Empire: From the Accession of Charles I. to the Restoration; with an Introduction, Tracing the Progress of Society, and of the Constitution, from the Feudal Times to the Opening of the History ; and Including a Particular Examination of Mr. Hume's Statements Relative to the Character of the English Government, Volume 1

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Bell & Bradfute, 1822 - Great Britain
 

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Page 467 - ... and to purchase with a part of its produce, or, what is the same thing, with the price of a part of it, whatever else they have occasion for. What is prudence in the conduct of every private family, can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom.
Page 405 - In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt But, being season'd with a gracious voice, Obscures the show of evil ? In religion, What damned error, but some sober brow Will bless it and approve it with a text...
Page 166 - , it is enacted that no man shall be attached by any accusation nor forejudged of life or limb, nor his lands, tenements, goods nor chattels seized into the King's hands against the form of the Great Charter and the law of the land...
Page 466 - To give the monopoly of the home market to the produce of domestic industry, in any particular art or manufacture, is in some measure to direct private people in what manner they ought to employ their capitals, and must, in almost all cases, be either a useless or a hurtful regulation. If the produce of domestic can be brought there as cheap as that of foreign industry, the regulation is evidently useless.
Page 196 - ... what has been adjudged to be so by the authority of the canonical scripture, or by the first four general councils, or any of them ; or by any other general council, wherein the same was declared heresy by the express and plain words of canonical scripture, or such as shall hereafter be declared to be heresy by the high court of parliament, with the assent of the clergy in convocation.
Page 127 - I hear the relations that are made from all parts of the world, not only from Norway and Lapland, from the East and West Indies, but from every particular nation in Europe, I cannot forbear thinking that there is such an intercourse and commerce with evil spirits, as that which we express by the name of witchcraft.
Page 29 - Inclosures at that time began to be more frequent, whereby arable land, which could not be manured without people and families, was turned into pasture, which was easily rid by a few herdsmen; and tenances for years, lives, and at will, whereupon much of the yeomanry lived, were turned into demesnes.
Page 299 - ... such as have been devised, made and ordained within this realm for the wealth of the same, or to such other as by sufferance of your Grace and your progenitors the people of this your realm have taken at their free liberty by their own consent to be used...
Page 397 - Geneva (says he) keep Pasche and Yule [Easter and Christmas], what have they for them ? They have no institution. As for our neighbour kirk of England, their service is an evil-said mass in English ; they want nothing of the mass but the liftings. I charge you, my good ministers, doctors, elders, nobles, gentlemen, and barons, to stand to your purity, and to exhort the people to do the same ; and I, forsooth, as long as I brook my life, shall maintain the same...
Page 335 - Papists there ; it were no reason that those that will refuse the airy sign of the cross after baptism should have their purses stuffed with any more solid and substantial crosses ; they fled me so...

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