Matters of Chance: A Novel

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Oct 27, 2009 - Fiction - 448 pages
Matters of Chance is a glorious, aptivating novel about Morgan and Maude Shurtliff, who fall in love and marry in the years before World WarII. Unable to have children of their own, Morgan and Maude adopt twin girls. The four go home to their beautiful house in the country outside ofNew York City and begin to settle into what they hope will be a long and happy life. When the twins are still young, Morgan is called to serve inWorld War II, leaving Maude to raise her daughters alone. Jeannette Haien has rendered Morgan's war experiences with astonishing detail, just as she has captured the American post-war era with a precision that is unrivaled in recent fiction.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - neddludd - LibraryThing

A compelling, old fashioned, narrative novel rich in detail which stretches from the late 30s to 1960.The characters are complex and richly drawn, albeit a bit too manipulated in certain contexts. The ... Read full review

MATTERS OF CHANCE

User Review  - Kirkus

Septuagenarian Haien's second novel (The All of It, 1986) is a simplistic though satisfying and pretty much traditional family chronicle. The word ``saga'' may be too dramatic to describe this history ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
9
Section 3
23
Section 4
44
Section 5
52
Section 6
101
Section 7
111
Section 8
123
Section 16
294
Section 17
297
Section 18
303
Section 19
308
Section 20
327
Section 21
358
Section 22
366
Section 23
388

Section 9
133
Section 10
159
Section 11
166
Section 12
189
Section 13
203
Section 14
243
Section 15
244
Section 24
402
Section 25
405
Section 26
415
Section 27
436
Section 28
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 159 - WHEN the Lord turned again the captivity of Zion, we were like them that dream. Then was our mouth filled with laughter, and our tongue with singing: then said they among the heathen, The Lord hath done great things for them.
Page 129 - And often did beguile her of her tears, When I did speak of some distressful stroke That my youth suffer'd. My story being done, She gave me for my pains a world of sighs : She swore, in faith, 'twas strange, 'twas passing strange, 'Twas pitiful, 'twas wondrous pitiful : She wish'd she had not heard it, yet she wish'd That heaven had made her such a man...
Page 121 - Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross, To see a fine lady upon a white horse; Rings on her fingers and bells on her toes, She shall have music wherever she goes.
Page 287 - I crossed a moor, with a name of its own And a certain use in the world no doubt, Yet a hand's-breadth of it shines alone 'Mid the blank miles round about: For there I picked up on the heather, And there I put inside my breast A moulted feather, an eagle-feather ! Well, I forget the rest.
Page 287 - AH, did you once see Shelley plain, And did he stop and speak to you? And did you speak to him again? How strange it seems, and new!
Page 128 - I ran it through, even from my boyish days, To the very moment that he bade me tell it. Wherein I spake of most disastrous chances ; Of moving accidents by flood and field ; Of hair-breadth 'scapes i...

References to this book

Midamerica, Volumes 24-26

Snippet view - 1997

About the author (2009)

Jeannette Haien is the author of the acclaimed novel The All of It , winner of the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In addition to her career as a writer, Jeannette Haien is well known as a concert pianist and teacher. She and her husband, a lawyer, live in New York City and Connemara, Ireland.

Bibliographic information