The History of Jamaica. Or, General Survey of the Antient and Modern State of that Island:: With Reflections on Its Situation, Settlements, Inhabitants, Climate, Products, Commerce, Laws, and Government. In Three Volumes. Illustrated with Copper Plates..

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T. Lowndes, in Fleet-Street., 1774 - Jamaica
 

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Page 644 - ... can have in any room whatever, and what indeed may be deemed quite free from danger of any stroke by lightning.
Page 640 - The lightning will not leave the rod (a good conductor) to pass into the wall (a bad conductor) through those staples. It would rather, if any were in the wall, pass out of it into the rod to get more readily by that conductor into the earth.
Page 592 - ... our atmosphere. In this the fragrant rose and deadly nightshade co-operate; nor is the herbage, nor the woods that flourish in the most remote and unpeopled regions unprofitable to us, nor we to them; considering how constantly the winds convey to them our vitiated air, for our relief, and for their nourishment.
Page 643 - ... an interrupted course through the air of the room and the bedding, when it can go through a continued better conductor, the wall. But where it can be had, a...
Page 667 - That the tides may have their full motion, the ocean in which they are produced ought to be extended from east to west 90...
Page 795 - ... acidity the lemon ; and the tree, that of the orange, having winged leaves. It is much smaller than the common lemon, and is principally brought to this country from the West-India islands, where, says Lunan...
Page 732 - Riz gave promife of rendering the importation of that article wholly unneceffary ; and as his colour, weight for weight, was found to go further in dying fabrics, than thrice the quantity of cochineal, a great faving would be made by the dyers themfelves> „ and their fabrics would be afforded at a cheaper rate, all which makes in favour of the national balance of trade. There is no doubt but the inventor, for a competent reward (of which he is well...
Page 798 - ... cut about half an inch below the eye, and with your knife flit off the bud with part of the wood to it, in form of an...
Page 732 - He alfo found two other proceffes, which promifed, with very little alteration in their manufactory, to afford the colour-making dyes of fcarlet and purple. Upon a moderate calculation it was found, that his colour would go further than three times the quantity of...

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