The general biographical dictionary. Revised by A. Chalmers

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Page 259 - He affects the metaphysics, not only in his satires, but in his amorous verses, where nature only should reign ; and perplexes the minds of the fair sex with nice speculations of philosophy, when he should engage their hearts, and entertain them with the softnesses of love.
Page 162 - Live while you live, the Epicure would say, And seize the pleasures of the present day. Live, while you live, the sacred Preacher cries, And give to God each moment as it flies.
Page 410 - I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England, too; and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain or any prince of Europe should dare to invade the borders of my realm; to which rather than any dishonour should grow by me, I myself will take up arms, I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder of every one of your virtues in the field.
Page 361 - I desire to be no longer the Sisyphus of the stage ; to roll up a stone with endless labour, which, to follow the proverb, gathers no moss, and which is perpetually falling down again. I never thought myself very fit for an employment, where many of my predecessors have excelled me in all kinds ; and some of my contemporaries, even in my own partial judgment, have outdone me in comedy.
Page 470 - Commons for leave to bring in a bill " for the better regulation of the affairs of the East India Company and of their servants in India, and for the due administration of justice in Bengal.
Page 259 - Biathanatos, a Declaration of that Paradox, or Thesis, that Self-Homicide is not so naturally Sin, that it may never be otherwise.
Page 359 - Tis not that I am mortified to all ambition, but I scorn as much to take it from half-witted judges, as I should to raise an estate by cheating of bubbles. Neither do I discommend the lofty style in Tragedy, which is naturally pompous and magnificent ; but nothing is truly sublime that is not just and proper.
Page 82 - He wrote against Popery, and embraced it ; he was a zealous opposer of the court, and a sacrifice for it ; was conscientiously converted in the midst of his prosecution of Lord Strafford, and was most unconscientiously a prosecutor of Lord Clarendon.
Page 124 - And when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked: and others said, We will hear thee again of this matter. 33 So Paul departed from among them. 34 Howbeit certain men clave unto him, and believed: among the which was Dionysius the Areopagite, and a woman named Damaris, and others with them.
Page 252 - I have seen a dreadful vision since I saw you: I have seen my dear wife pass twice by me through this room, with her hair hanging about her shoulders, and a dead child in her arms : this I have seen since I saw you.

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