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TO

R. VALPY, D.D. F. A.S.

WHO THROUGH A LONG AND USEFUL LIFE HAS ASSIDUOUSLY AND

SUCCESSFULLY LABORED TO SIMPLIFY THE ELEMENTS OF

CLASSICAL KNOWLEGE,

THIS WORK IS INSCRIBED,

WITH EVERY SENTIMENT OF ESTEEM AND AFFECTION,

BY

THE AUTHOR.

SHORTLY WILL BE PUBLISHED,

THE

ETYMOLOGY OF THE LATIN LANGUAGE,

AS FAR AS IT IS DI RIVED EITHER FROM ITSELF

OR FROM THE GREEK.

Intended chiefly for the higher classes of Grammar Schools.

By F. VALPY, M.A. Trin. Coll. Camb.

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(A Specimen of the Work is here subjoined.) Sabbatum, a sabbath : cáß- wh. aum, aCum, (as créos, βατον

speCus), sæcum (as šow, Sero) Sabulum, gravelly soil : for Sæpe, often : fr. sapes or sesatibulum fr. sero, satum, as Sto, pes, a hedge. “A rustic word of Statum, Stabulum.“ ARENA is ancient date; for, as (sæpes) a thin and barren ; SA BULUM is hedge is thick, they expressed more thick and moist, and is OFTEN by sæpe, thickly,' S. more fit for producing seed,'' Sæpes : See Sepes F. That is, it is more fit for * Savus, cruel : SOWING,

Or sabulum is a di- vus,' V. F. Scavus is, untoward, minutive of sabus for samus fr. perverse; was savus primarily ψάμος, ψάμμος, sand

applied to one of untoward, Saburra, sand for ballast: fr. peevish, angry, harsh temper? sabulum. Some trace it to Celt. From reúw, I am furious,' A. sabr

Saga, a wise woman, witch; Saccharum, sugar: cáxxagov sagax, quick-scented; applied to Saccus, a sack: cáxxos the mind, sagacious : from sagio,

Sacer, sacred : for sager fr. (wb. præsagio,) I have keen perayos, purity. S as , Sex ception or discernment

Sacerdos, a priest : fr. sacer. Sagēna, a fishing net: ocynun Compare Dulcedo, Viridis, Pal- Sagīna, meat for cramming lidus. Or fr. sacra do

animals: fr. σαγώ, f. 2. of σάττω, Sacrilegus, sacrilegious : qui I cram, stuff sacra legit. Vel quæ sublegi Sagitta, a dart: fr. axioTY, tacitus tibi carmina nuper,' Virg. pointed, fr. axiğw. Acista, acitta,

Sæculum, an age : for secu- (as mittig for alotis) sacitta (as culum or seququlum fr. sequor, égw, Sero), sagitta. V.compares from one age following or suc- Segesta fr. 'Axéota ceeding another. Or a diminu- Sagmen, vervain, hierba pura : tive of sæcum fr. aiwy, (an age) for sagimen fr. ayos, pure

• Est arena hinc inde jacta sparsaque et quasi SEMINATA,' V. 2 Comp. ævum fr. alóv.

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mon LEAP

part,'F.

Sagum, sagas,

a soldier's

Salpincta, salpicta, a trumcloak: σάγος

peter: σαλπιγκτής Sal, g. salis, salt: fr. ddos g. Saltem, at least : for sautem, of das. As ex, Sex

(as vv, the Cretan aủxd for åxxd) Salacon, a poor man boasting sin autem : BUT IF NOT this, at of riches : σαλάκων

least that Salamandra, a salamander : Saltus, a wood; or, a lawn σαλαμάνδρα

in a park: fr. saltum sp. of salio, Salar, a salnion peel; and from the leaping and frisking of salmo, for salimo, a salınon : fr. animals in it salio. Compare the term, sal- Saluber, healthful: fr. salus

Salum, sea, deep sea, rough Salarium, a salary: fr. sal. sea : σάλος • A stated allowance of meat of Salus, safety, health : for saüs which SALT was

a necessary fr. chos, safe

Saluto, I greet: I wish (saluSalar, lecherous: fr. salio,' tem) health to 'Cùm equus matrem ut saliret Salvia, sage: fr. salvus, from adduci non posset,' Varro its salutary qualities. Cur mo

Salebra, e, rough places: riatur homo, cui salvia crescit in fr. salio, as Scatebra from Sca- horto?' Schola Salentina teo. Over which it is necessary Salvus, safe, whole : fr. salus to leap perpetually

Sambūca, a sackbut; a drawSalii, priests of Mars: fr. bridge: caußúxn salio; from their LEAPING and Sambucus, an alder tree: fr. capering as they carried the sambuca, which were made of sacred bucklers. Hence Salia- it res Epulæ in Horace

Samia, a kind of cake: from Salio, I leap: fr. áraw, wh. the island Samos, where the best ärdomar, I leap. As áros, allus samia were made and used in

Saliva, spittle : clanov, wh. the sacrifices of Juno gáïdov, cáncv, sulia, sali Va. Or Sancio, I decree, ordain : for fr. sal, salis, from its briny na- sacio fr, sacer. I CONSECRATE ture

a law by the offering of a victim Salmacidus, briny and sour: Sanctus, decreed ; made safr. arun, brine; and acidus cred by decree or law; sacred : Salmo : See Salar

fr. sanctum sp, of sancio Salo-pygium, a wag-tail: fr. Sandalium, a sandal: cavováros, motion; nuyn, tailor λιον rump

Sandapăla, a bier for the Salpa, a stock-fish: cánt poor: fr. σανιδο-πύελος ; fr. σα

1 Referred by some to oáros, motion of the sea.

From libidinous motions of the body.

2 Donatus derives it from the cry of Salutem by captives : Spare my life, if nothing else.

PREFACE.

To diminish, as far as is practicable, the toil attendant on acquiring the fundamental words of the Greek language, and to fix them, when acquired, firmly and durably on the memory, is the object of this publication.

The labor attending the acquirement of the words of languages is usually very tedious and uninteresting. Our own older poets lie neglected in consequence of the numerous words they employ which are now obsolete and not understood. Even Shakspeare, the immortal Shakspeare, the poet 'who is not for an age but for all time,' is gradually losing his hold of the general attention from the same cause. How much more must this reason apply to writers who do not engage our national vanity, and who write in a language not now spoken by any country in the world?

duw is, I build or construct. There is nothing in this word, thus stated, which points to this meaning. It might as well be γέμω, δέρω, or any other verb. But from dédouc, the perfect middle of dew, is formed domus. Hence arises a distinction between this and other verbs; and its meaning is fixed on the mind by a durable and pleasing association. Again : Decoua is, I view. This fact, thus barely stated, is easily forgotten. But from the perfect τεθέαται is θέατρον, a theatre, a place for VIEWING objects of pleasure. Thus we become acquainted

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