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my wife, “not silver, the rims not silver!"_"No," cried I, no more silver than your saucepan.”

“ And so," returned she, “we have parted with the colt, and have only got a gross of green spectacles with copper rims and shagreen cases !

A murrain take such trumpery! The blockhead has been imposed upon, and should have known his company better.”—“ There, my dear,” cried I, “you are wrong, he should not have known them at all.”—“Marry, hang the idiot!” returned she, “ to bring me such stuff; if I had them, I would throw them in the fire!"_“ There again, you are wrong, my dear,” cried I; “ for though they be copper, we will keep them by us, as copper spectacles, you know, are better than nothing.”

By this time the unfortunate Moses was undeceived. He now saw that he had indeed been imposed upon by a prowling sharper, who, observing his figure, had marked him for an easy prey. I therefore asked the circumstances of his deception. He sold the horse, it seems, and walked the fair in search of another. A reverend-looking man brought him to a tent, under pretence of having one to sell. “ Here," continued Moses, “ we met another man, very well dressed, who desired to borrow twenty pounds upon these, saying, that he wanted money, and would dispose of them for a third of the value. The first gentleman, who pretended to be my friend, whispered me to buy them, and cautioned me not to let so good an offer pass. I sent for Mr. Flamborough, and they talked him up as finely as they did

me, and so at last we were persuaded to buy the two gross between us."

N

[graphic]

There seemed, indeed, something applicable to both sides in this letter, and its censures might as well be referred to those to whom it was written, as to us; but the malicious meaning was obvious, and we went no farther.

Page 108

CHAPTER XIII.

MR. BURCHELL IS FOUND TO BE AN ENEMY; FOR HE HAS THE CONFIDENCE

TO GIVE DISAGREEABLE ADVICE.

Our family had now made several attempts to be fine; but some unforeseen disaster demolished each as soon as projected. I endeavoured to take the advantage of every disappointment, to improve their good sense in proportion as they were frustrated in ambition. “ You see, my children,” cried I,“ how little is to be got by attempts to impose upon the world, in coping with our betters. Such as are poor and will associate with none but the rich, are hated by those they avoid, and despised by those they follow. Unequal combinations are always disadvantageous to the weaker side: the rich having the pleasure, and the poor the inconveniences that result from them. But come, Dick, my boy, and repeat the fable that you were reading to-day, for the good of the company."

“Once upon a time,” cried the child, “ a Giant and a Dwarf were friends, and kept together. They made a bargain that they would never forsake each other, but go seek adventures. The first battle they fought was with two Saracens; and the Dwarf, who was very courageous, dealt one of the champions a most angry blow. It did the Saracen very little injury, who lifting up his sword, fairly struck off the poor Dwarf's arm. He was now in a woful plight; but the Giant coming to his assistance, in a short time left the two Saracens dead on the plain ; and the Dwarf cut off the dead man's head out of spite. They then travelled on to another adventure. This was against three bloodyminded Satyrs, who were carrying away a damsel in distress. The Dwarf was not quite so fierce now 'as before ; but for all that struck the first blow, which was returned by another, that knocked out his eye; but the Giant was soon up with them, and had they not fled would certainly have killed them every one. They were all very joyful for this victory, and the damsel who was relieved, fell in love with the Giant and married him. They now travelled far, and farther than I can tell, till they met with a company of robbers. The Giant, for the first time, was foremost now; but the Dwarf was not far behind. The battle was stout and long. Wherever the Giant came all fell before him; but the Dwarf had like to have been killed more than once. At last the victory declared for the two adventurers; but the Dwarf lost his leg. The Dwarf was now without an arm, a leg, and an eye, while the Giant was without a single wound. Upon which he cried out to his little companion, My little hero, this is glorious sport; let us get one victory more, and then we shall have honour for ever! No, cries the Dwarf, who was by this time grown wiser, no, I declare off; I 'll fight no more: for I find in every battle that you get all the honour and rewards, but all the blows fall

upon me.”

I was going to moralize this fable when our attention was called off to a warm dispute between my wife

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