Conversations of German Refugees ; Wilhelm Meister's Journeyman Years, Or, The Renunciants

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Princeton University Press, Nov 5, 1995 - Literary Criticism - 440 pages

Goethe was a master of the short prose form. His two narrative cycles, Conversations of German Refugees and Wilhelm Meister's Journeyman Years, both written during a high point of his career, address various social issues and reveal his experimentation with narrative and perspective. A traditional cycle of novellas, Conversations of German Refugees deals with the impact and significance of the French Revolution and suggests Goethe's ideas on the social function of his art. Goethe's last novel, Wilhelm Meister's Journeyman Years, is a sequel to Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship and to Conversations of German Refugees and is considered to be his most remarkable novel in form.

 

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Contents

Conversations of German Refugees
13
The Fairy Tale
70
Wilhelm Meisters Journeyman Years or The Renunciants
93
BOOK ONE
97
Chapter Two
101
The Visitation
106
The Lily Stalk
109
Chapter Three
112
Chapter Ten
281
Chapter Eleven
284
ART ETHICS NATURE
294
BOOK THREE
313
Chapter Two
319
Chapter Three
321
Chapter Four
330
Chapter Five
332

Chapter Four
116
Chapter Five
126
The Deranged Pilgrim
128
Chapter Six
138
Chapter Seven
148
Chapter Eight
153
Chapter Nine
164
Chapter Ten
174
Chapter Eleven
184
Chapter Twelve
195
BOOK TWO
199
Chapter Two
206
Chapter Three
212
Chapter Four
227
Chapter Five
237
Chapter Six
253
Chapter Seven
254
Chapter Eight
267
Chapter Nine
277
Chapter Six
342
The New Melusine
343
Chapter Seven
358
Chapter Eight
359
The Perilous Wager
360
Chapter Nine
363
Chapter Ten
369
Not Too Far
370
Chapter Eleven
378
Chapter Twelve
381
Chapter Thirteen
385
Chapter Fourteen
400
Chapter Fifteen
409
Chapter Sixteen
412
Chapter Seventeen
414
Chapter Eighteen
416
FROM MAKARIES ARCHIVES
417
Notes
437
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1749-1832 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was born in Frankfurt am Main. He was greatly influenced by his mother, who encouraged his literary aspirations. After troubles at school, he was taught at home and gained an exceptionally wide education. At the age of 16, Goethe began to study law at Leipzig University from 1765 to 1768, and he also studied drawing with Adam Oeser. After a period of illness, he resumed his studies in Strasbourg from 1770 to 1771. Goethe practiced law in Frankfurt for two years and in Wetzlar for a year. He contributed to the Frankfurter Gelehrte Anzeigen from 1772 to 1773, and in 1774 he published his first novel, self-revelatory Die Leiden des Jungen Werthers. In 1775 he was welcomed by Duke Karl August into the small court of Weimar, where he worked in several governmental offices. He was a council member and member of the war commission, director of roads and services, and managed the financial affairs of the court. Goethe was released from day-to-day governmental duties to concentrate on writing, although he was still general supervisor for arts and sciences, and director of the court theatres. In the 1790s Goethe contributed to Friedrich von Schiller ́s journal Die Horen, published Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, and continued his writings on the ideals of arts and literature in his own journal, Propylšen. The first part of his masterwork, Faust, appeared in 1808, and the second part in 1832. Goethe had worked for most of his life on this drama, and was based on Christopher Marlowe's Faust. From 1791 to 1817, Goethe was the director of the court theatres. He advised Duke Carl August on mining and Jena University, which for a short time attracted the most prominent figures in German philosophy. He edited Kunst and Altertum and Zur Naturwissenschaft. Goethe died in Weimar on March 22, 1832. He and Duke Schiller are buried together, in a mausoleum in the ducal cemetery.

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