The victims of society

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Page 274 - When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice: then must you speak Of one that...
Page 256 - Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased ; Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow ; Raze out the written troubles of the brain ; And, with some sweet, oblivious antidote, Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff, Which weighs upon the heart ? Doct.
Page 168 - Heptarchy, have been seen humbling themselves, by the lowest arts of degradation, to soften the obdurate autocratesses; and we fear it is no exaggeration to say, that more than one parvenu has been known to barter his vote in parliament, and more than one parvenue her honour, for a ball-ticket. The prestige has greatly abated, and the institution is now tottering to its fall ; but its origin is worth recording, as a ludicrous phenomenon in the progress of society.
Page 127 - France, which, even though wanting in sincerity, possess a certain charm ; as flattery, if judiciously administered, is always acceptable, however much we may despise the flatterer.
Page 203 - Pray do not trouble yourself on the subject," answered Lady Sophia, "I have no intention of wedding a Nimrod, I assure you, for I am of opinion that it is better to lead apes in a place not to be named to ears polite, than to be tied to a fool on earth.
Page 168 - A few pretty woman, not in the highest rank of the nobility, met at Devonshire House to practise quadrilles, then recently imported from the continent. The establishment of a subscription-ball was suggested, to which none but the very e"lite were to be admissible ; the subscription to be low, with the view of checking the obtrusive vulgarity of wealth. The fancy took, and when it transpired that the patronesses had actually refused a most estimable English Duchess, all London became mad to be admitted...
Page 166 - Mscenases, who patronise poets and philosophers, from the association with whom they expect to derive distinction. For gentle dulness they have a peculiar predilection — from sympathy, I suppose ; a fellow-feeling being said to make men wondrous kind. A few of the houses with the most pretensions to literary taste have their tame poets and petits litterateurs, who run about as docile, and more parasitical, than lap-dogs; and, like them, are equally well-fed, ay, and certainly equally spoiled.
Page 206 - ... Benedicts every night — at least, it is but charitable to suppose that such is their object. These very clubs, too, furnish another and powerful antidote to matrimony. The luxurious sensualists who frequent them, being, for the most part, gastronomers, who prefer a well-dressed dinner to the best-dressed woman in the world, are well aware that the recherche repasts, with
Page 60 - Lablache's is also a voice that has great charms for me. It comes pealing forth, grand and powerful as a choir in some lofty temple : while Rubini's always reminds me of the plaintive, never to be forgotten chant of the Miserere in the Sixtine chapel at Rome, which, though heard while I was yet only a child, I remember as distinctly as if it had been but yesterday.
Page 38 - I verily believe, shall see again, except in her. Then, her figure ! by Jove, it is matchless ! All the elasticity and bounding animation of the child, with all the rounded beauty of contour of the woman. Arms that might serve as models to the sculptor ; hands that look as...

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