The Statistical Account of Scotland: Drawn Up from the Communications of the Ministers of the Different Parishes, Volume 12

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Sir John Sinclair
W. Creech, 1794 - Scotland

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184
187
617

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Page 617 - At that fair it was the custom for unmarried persons of both sexes to choose a companion, according to their liking, with whom they were to live till that time next year. This was called "hand-fasting," or hand in fist. If they were pleased with each other at that time, then they continued together for life : if not, they separated, and were free to make another choice as at the first.
Page 326 - The gulf is most awful with the flowing tide. In stormy weather, with that tide, it exhibits an aspect in which a great deal of the terrible is blended. Vast openings are formed, in which one would think the bottom might be seen. Immense bodies of water tumble headlong, as over a precipice ; then rebounding from the abyss, meet the torrents from above, Theydashtogetberwithinconceivable impetuosity, and rise Jurať *". foaming to a prodigious height above the surface.
Page 617 - Hand-fasting' have taken its rise from their manner of celebrating Marriage, exusu, by which if a woman, with the consent of her parents, or guardians, lived with a man for a year, without being absent three nights, she became his wife ? Perhaps, when Christianity was introduced, this form of Marriage may have been looked upon as imperfect, without confirmation by a priest, and therefore, one may have been sent from time to time for this purpose.
Page 617 - ... or hand in fist. If they were pleased with each other at that time, then they continued together for life: if not, they separated, and were free to make another choice as at the first. The fruit of the connexion (if there were any) was always attached to the disaffected person.
Page 10 - To provide against these, strong eastles were constructed by the kings of Scotland on the lower parts of the Tweed ; and the chain was continued by the great feudal proprietors towards the head of it.
Page 617 - ... connexion (if there were any) was always attached to the disaffected person. In later times, when this part of the country belonged to the Abbacy of Melrose, a priest to whom they gave the name of Book i...
Page 467 - ... regarded in silent awe ; and as he appeared cheerful or dejected, the anxious votaries drew their presages ; their breasts vibrated with correspondent emotions. Like the Delai Lama of Thibet, or the King of Great Britain, whom a fiction of the English law supposes never to die, the Guardian Fly of the Well of St. Michael was believed to be exempted from the laws of mortality. To the eye of ignorance he might sometimes appear dead, but agreeably to the Druidic system, it was only a transmigration...
Page 467 - Not later than a fortnight ago " (it is added) " the writer of this account was much entertained to hear an old man lamenting with regret the degeneracy of the times, particularly the contempt in which objects of former veneration were held by the unthinking crowd. If the infirmities of years and the distance of his residence did not prevent him, he would still pay his devotional visits to the well of St Michael. He would clear the bed of its...
Page 156 - Sarada is shown to be the immediate descendant, continued up to the end of the 8th or the beginning of the 9th century AD, which thus becomes the epoch of Sarada.
Page 566 - Roman coins, &c. arc said to have been found. In Megget, which is part of the parish of Lyne, are the remains of two old towers, which appear to have been built partly for defence, partly for accommodating the kings of Scotland, when on their hunting parties in the forest. The traces of three or four roads, in different directions, across the hills, are still visible. At what period, or with what design they were formed, is uncertain. Perhaps, when. the country was covered with wood, they were cut...

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