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Marco Bozzaris . ..

.. . Halleck. 90

Moonlight--and a Field of Battle . . . Shelley. 92

Manfred to the Sorceress - - - - - Byron. 106

The Sword - - - - - Miss Langdon. 107

Spirit of Freedom - -

Percival. 113

Parting of Douglas and Marmion

Scott. 114

The Spirit firm and free ..

- - Anon. 122

What's Hallowed Ground - - . . Campbell. 123

Absalom's Dream · · · ·


·

Hillhouse. 136

The Deluge . . . . . . Bowles. 138

The Leper . -

. Willis.- 139

Counsel of Ahithophel to Absalom -

- Hillhouse. 151

Counsel of Hushai . . . . . . Ibid. 151

Speech of Raab Kiuprili . . . . Coleridge. 152

Speech of William Tell . . . . . Knowles. 158

Rienzi to the Romans . . . . . Moore. 158

Parody on Hamlet's Soliloquy

- Anon. 163

Tyrolese War Song . . . . .. Anon. 171

Leonidas - - -

- -

Croly. 172

Duke of Milan to Charles V. . . . . . Massinger. 173

Burial of Sir John Moore . . . . - Wolfe. 183

The Star . .

Read. 184

Warren's Address to the American Soldiers

Pierpont. 185

Christ stilling the Tempest ...

Mrs. Hemans. 185

Spectacles - - - -

Byrom. 190

Bernardo Del Carpio . . . . Mrs. Hemans. 191

Soliloquy of Wallenstein . . . . Schiller. 196

The Eagle - -

- - - - Percival. 203

Cassabianca . . . . . . Mrs. Hemans. 205

Regulus - - - - - - . Dale. 206

Dionysius to his Soldiers . . . . . Murphy. 216

Zanga's Reasons for hating Alonzo - . . . Young. 216

An Ode . . . . . . - Hughes. 229

The Soldier's Dream . . . . . Campbell. 231

Absalom

Willis. 231

The Newspaper - - . .

Cowper. 241

Night . . . . . . . . Smith. 243

Stanzas . . . . . . . Watts. 250

Jacob's Dream . . . . . . Anon. 252

Address of Álasco to his Countrymen .

Shee. 253

Bishop of Carlisle's Speech in defence of Richard II. - Shakspeare. 254

Rienzi's Address to the Romans . . . Miss Mitford. 260

The Death of Leonidas

Croly. 261

Echoes

· · · · · · Proctor. 262

Greece - · · · · · · Byron. 276

Landing of the Pilgrim Fathers . . . Mrs. IIemans. 277

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THE

ACADEMICAL SPEAKER.

EXTRACT FROM A SPEECH OF PATRICK HENRY IN THE LEGISLA

TURE OF VIRGINIA, IN FAVOUR OF PERMITTING THE BRITISH REFUGEES TO RETURN TO THE UNITED STATES.

The personal feelings of a politician ought not to be permitted to enter these walls. The question before us is a national one, and in deciding it, if we act wisely, nothing will be regarded but the interest of the nation. On the altar of my country's good, I, for one, am willing to sacrifice all personal resentments, all private wrongs; and I flatter myself that I am not the only man in this house, who is capable of making such a sacrifice.

We have, Sir, an extensive country, without population. What can be a more obvious policy than that this country ought to be peopled? People form the strength and constitute the wealth of a nation. I want to see our vast forests filled up, by some process a little more speedy than the ordinary course of nature. I wish to see these states rapidly ascending to that rank, which their natural advantages authorize them to hold among the nations of the earth.

Cast your eyes, Sir, over this extensive country. Observe the salubrity of your climate; the variety and fertility of your soil; and see that soil intersected, in every quarter, by bold navigable streams, flowing to the East and to the West, as if the finger of Heaven were marking out the course of your settlements, inviting you to enterprise, and pointing the way to wealth.

Sir, you are destined, at some period or other, to become a great agricultural and commercial people: the only question is, whether you choose to reach this point by slow gra

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