The German classics of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: masterpieces of German literature, tr. into English

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The German publication society, 1914 - English literature
 

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Page 478 - Professor Schmidt. I should much like one of you to keep as an heirloom the instruments given to me by Prince L., but let no strife arise between you concerning them; if money should be of more service to you, just sell them. How happy I feel that even when lying in my grave, I may be useful to you. So let it be. I joyfully hasten to meet death. If it come before I have had opportunity to develop all my artistic faculties, it will come, my hard fate notwithstanding, too soon, and I should probably...
Page 58 - Thirty Years" and more, A lonely outpost have I held — in vain ! With no triumphant hope or prize in store, Without a thought to see my home again. I watched both day and night ; I could not sleep Like my well-tented comrades far behind, Though near enough to let their snoring keep A friend awake, if e'er to doze inclined. And thus, when solitude my spirits shook, Or fear — for all but fools know fear sometimes — To rouse myself and them, I piped and took A gay revenge in all my wanton rhymes.
Page 53 - This cross of the Legion of Honor bright, Let it lie near my heart, upon me; Give me my musket in my hand, And gird my sabre on me. "So will I lie, and arise no more, My watch like a sentinel keeping, Till I hear the cannon's thundering roar, And the squadrons above me sweeping. ' ' Then the Emperor comes ! and his banners wave, With their eagles o 'er him bending, And I will come forth, all in arms, from my grave, Napoleon, Napoleon attending ! ' ' BELSHAZZAR*(1822) To midnight now the night drew...
Page 121 - Luckily for them, they already knew in their cradles what nouns have their accusative in im. I, on the contrary, had to learn them by heart in the sweat of my brow ; nevertheless, it is fortunate...
Page 477 - ... accepted among worthy artists and men. You my brothers Carl and as soon as I am dead if Dr. Schmid is still alive ask him in my name to describe my malady and attach this...
Page 476 - Ah, how could I possibly admit an infirmity in the one sense which ought to be more perfect in me than in others, a sense which I once possessed in the highest perfection, a perfection such as few in my profession enjoy or ever have enjoyed.
Page 477 - Recommend to your children virtue, it alone can bring happiness, not money. I speak from experience. It was virtue which bore me up in time of trouble; to her, next to my art, I owe thanks for my not having laid violent hands on myself.
Page 135 - The Frenchman loves liberty as his bride. He burns for her ; he is a flame ; he casts himself at her feet with the most extravagant protestations ; he will fight for her to the death ; he commits for her sake a thousand follies. The German loves liberty as though she were his old grandmother.
Page 471 - My Dear, My Good Amenda, My Heartily Beloved Friend : With deep emotion, with mixed pain and pleasure, did I receive and read your last letter. To what can I compare your fidelity, your attachment to me. Oh! how pleasant it is that you have always remained so kind to me ; yes, I also know that you, of all men, are the most trustworthy. You are no Viennese friend; no, you are one of those such as my native country produces. How often do I wish you were with me, for your Beethoven is most unhappy and...
Page 121 - ... how could I ever in later years have found out any one in Berlin, where one house is as like another as drops of water or as grenadiers, and where it is impossible to find a friend unless you have the number of his house in your head ? Therefore I associated with every friend some historical event which had happened in a year corresponding to the number of his house, so that the one recalled the other, and some curious point in history always occurred to me whenever I met any one whom I visited....

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