Letters written by lord Chesterfield to his son, ed. with notes, tr.of the Lat., Fr., and Ital. quotations and a biogr. notice of the author, by C.S. Carey, Volume 1

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Page 334 - THE RESULT OF MUCH GOOD SENSE, SOME GOOD NATURE, AND A LITTLE SELF-DENIAL FOR THE SAKE OF OTHERS, AND WITH A VIEW TO OBTAIN THE SAME INDULGENCE FROM THEM.
Page 384 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Page 316 - This flapper is likewise employed diligently to attend his master in his walks, and upon occasion to give him a soft flap on his eyes ; because he is always so wrapped up in cogitation, that he is in manifest danger of falling down every precipice and bouncing his head against every post, and in the streets, of jostling others, or being jostled himself, into the kennel.
Page 175 - Speak of the Moderns without contempt, and of the Ancients without idolatry ; judge them all by their merits, but not by their ages ; and if you happen to have an Elzevir classic in your pocket, neither show it nor mention it.
Page 356 - ... the style, and the turn of the periods, make the chief impression upon the hearers. Give them but one or two round and harmonious periods in a speech, which they will retain and repeat ; and they will go home as well satisfied as people do from an opera, humming all the way one or two favorite tunes that have struck their ears, and were easily caught.
Page 252 - His figure was beautiful, but his manner was irresistible by either man or woman. It was by this engaging, graceful manner that he was enabled, during all his war, to connect the various and jarring powers of the Grand Alliance, and to carry them on to the main object of the war, notwithstanding their private and separate views, jealousies, and wrongheadednesses. Whatever court he. went to (and he was often obliged to go himself to some testy and refractory ones), he as constantly prevailed and brought...
Page 320 - A man of fashion never has recourse to proverbs, and vulgar aphorisms ; uses neither favourite words nor hard words; but takes great care to speak very correctly and grammatically, and to pronounce properly; that is, according to the usage of the best companies.
Page 86 - Twas dead of night, when weary bodies close Their eyes in balmy sleep, and soft repose : The winds no longer whisper through the woods, Nor murmuring tides disturb the gentle floods. The stars in silent order moved around ; And Peace, with downy wings, was brooding on the ground. The flocks and herds, and...
Page 385 - History without having maps, and a chronological hook, or tables, lying by you, and constantly recurred to ; without which, History is only a confused heap of facts. One method more I recommend to you, by which I have found great benefit, even in the most dissipated part of my life ; that is, to rise early, and at the same hour every morning, how late soever you may have sat up the night before. This secures you an hour or two, at least...
Page 363 - We must not suppose, that because a man is a rational animal, he will, therefore, always act rationally; or, because he has such or such a predominant passion, that he will act invariably and consequentially in the pursuit of it.

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