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Raised by the breath of Love Divine,

Weurge our way with strength renewed; The church of the first-born to join,

We travel to the mount of God ;
With joy upon our heads arise,
And meet our Captain in the skies.

And when the knell of death is rung,
Loud hallelujahs shall be sung
To welcome us to God.

" Christian Hymns."

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351.–Lovest Thou Me?

JOHN xxi. 15. HIS simple and pathetic Hymn has

attracted fresh notice in recent years owing to the Italian version of it by

Mr. Gladstone, published in the Nineteenth Century for September, 1883. Mr. Gladstone writes : "To the Italian language, so rich in poetry, the Hymn, in one sense of the word, is almost unknown. Religious exercises were supplied, within the Latin communion, with the Latin hymns, and hymns in the vernacular, both here and in Germany, may be considered, I presume, as a product of the change which restored the use of the mother tongue in the services of our Church. Although the want has not been felt in Italy, the language in which Dante wrote cannot be incapable of the force and compression, both in force and substance, proper to the Hymn."

The translation is remarkably successful throughout. We give the first verse :

FT, as we run the weary way,
That leads through shadows unto

day,
With trial sore amazed,
We deem our sorrows are unknown,
Our battle joined and fought alone,

Our victory unpraised.

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Faithless and blind, who cannot trace The witnesses who watch our race,

Beyond the senses' ken; The mighty cloud of all who died With faithful rapture, humble pride,

For love of God and men.

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Who, from the battlements above, Follow our course with eager love,

And cheer our contest on ; Who cry at every faithful blow, Struck at the old usurping foe

“Servant of God, well done.”

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And One, the conqueror of death,
Captain and perfecter of faith,

Who, for the joy of love,
Endured the cross, despised the shame,
Awakes in us the battle flame,

And waits for us above.

“I delivered thee when bound,
And, when bleeding, healed thy wound;
Sought thee wandering, set thee right:
Turned Thy darkness into light.

Therefore with patience run the race,
With joy and confidence and grace,

With cheerful hope and power ;
Cast off the sin that checks our speed,
The weights that faith and love impede,

Withstand the evil hour.

Can a woman's tender care Cease towards a child she bare? Yes, she may forgetful be, Yet will I remember Thee.

For Heaven is round us as we move, Our days are compassed with its love,

Its light is on our road :

“Mine is an unchanging love, Higher than the heights above ; Deeper than the depths beneath ; Free and faithful, strong as death.

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.

Lord, it is my chief complaint,
That my love is weak and faint,
Yet I love Thee, and adore :
O for grace to love Thee more.

W. COWPER.

352.—" Remember Me."

NEHEMIAH xiii. 31. HIS Hymn from its directness, truth

fulness, and simplicity, still holds a place in our collections.

It is a favourable specimen of the devout author's compositions, and (as in so many cases) the alterations which most editors have made appear by no means improvements : as when, for instance, the solemn words with which the last verse opens are attenuated to:

353.-“Begone Unbelief.”

MATTHEW viii. 26. ERHAPS the most characteristic of

Newton's Hymns. It is rough, unpolished, and mixes metaphors in a

surprising way. Yet it has laid hold upon devout hearts as few other Hymns have done. The emotions of which it is the outpouring belong to periods of our spiritual history in which there is little disposition to dwell upon the graces of style, or to criticise uncouthness of expression. We have therefore had no hesitation in admitting it, although it has been rejected by many modern hymn-editors.

6.5.
EGONE, unbelief,

My Saviour is near,
And for

my

relief
Will surely appear ;
By prayer let me wrestle,

And He will perform ;
With Christ in the vessel,

I smile at the storm.

BEGON

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Though dark be my way,

Since He is my guide, 'Tis mine to obey,

'Tis His to provide : Though cisterns be broken,

And creatures all fail, The word He hath spoken

Shall surely prevail.

Temptations sore obstruct my way,

And ills I cannot flee; O give me strength, Lord ! as my day ;

For good remember me !

His love in time past

Forbids me to think He'll leave me at last

In trouble to sink ; Each sweet Ebenezer

I have in review Confirms His good pleasure

To help me quite through.

Distressed with pain, disease, and grief

This feeble body see ;
Grant patience, rest, and kind relief;

Hear, and remember me !

If on my face, for Thy dear name,

Shame and reproaches be, All hail, reproach! and welcome, shame!

If Thou remember me.

Determined to save,

He watched o'er my path, When, Satan's blind slave,

I sported with death :

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I know that trial is His love

With but a graver face ; That veiled in sorrow, earthwards move

His ministries of grace.

May none depart till I have gained

The blessing which it bears, And learn, though late, I entertained

An angel unawares !

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So will I bless the hour that sent

The mercy of the rod ;
And build an altar by the tent
Where I have met with God.

JAMES D. BURNS.

360.–The Peace of Jesus.

JOHN xiv. 27.
Y peace I give unto you." Seldom,

perhaps, has a more touching and
beautiful commentary on

these words been given than in the following lines. “Herein," it has been well said, “does His peace differ from that which 'the world giveth,' in that its prime essential is not ease, but strife ; not sell-indulgence, but selfsacrifice ; not acquiescence in evil for the sake of quiet, but conflict with it for the sake of God."

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E ask for peace, O Lord !

Thy children ask Thy peace ;
Not what the world calls rest,

That toil and care should cease,
That through bright sunny hours

Calm life should fleet away,
And tranquil night should fade

In smiling day ;-
It is not for such peace that we would pray.

WE

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