The Shipwreck: A Poem

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John White and R. Dodd, 1808 - English poetry - 175 pages
 

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Page 108 - Maro's art To wake to sympathy the feeling heart ; Like him the smooth and mournful verse to dress In all the pomp of exquisite distress, Then too severely taught by cruel fate, To share in all the perils I relate, Then might I with...
Page 32 - The sun's bright orb, declining all serene, Now glanced obliquely o'er the woodland scene : Creation smiles around ; on every spray The warbling birds exalt their evening lay; Blithe skipping o'er yon hill, the fleecy train Join the deep chorus of the lowing plain ; The golden lime, and orange, there were seen On fragrant branches of perpetual green ; The crystal streams that velvet meadows lave, To the green ocean roll with chiding wave.
Page 64 - The envenom'd mantle from his side he tore ; When, stung with burning pain, he strove too late To stop the swift career of cruel fate ; Yet then his heart one ray of hope procured...
Page 22 - Thames meandering rolls his ample tide : There live the hope and pleasure of his life, A pious daughter, and a faithful wife : For his return with fond officious care Still every grateful object these prepare : Whatever can allure the smell or sight, Or wake the drooping spirits to delight, " This blooming maid in virtue's path to guide The...
Page xiv - Or listen to the enchanting voice of love, While all Elysium warbled through the grove : so Oh ! by the hollow blast that moans around, That sweeps the wild harp with a plaintive sound ; By the long surge that foams through yonder cave, Whose vaults remurmur to the roaring wave...
Page 106 - O yet confirm my heart, ye powers above, This last tremendous shock of fate to prove ; The tottering frame of reason yet sustain ; Nor let this total ruin whirl my brain. In vain the cords and axes were prepared, For now th...
Page 109 - Some, from the main-yard-arm impetuous thrown On marble ridges, die without a groan : Three with Palemon on their skill depend, And from the wreck on oars and rafts descend ; Now on the mountain-wave on high they ride, Then downward plunge beneath the...
Page 8 - Had left behind Trinacria's burning isle, And visited the margin of the Nile : And now, that winter deepens round the pole, The circling voyage hastens to its goal ; They, blind to Fate's inevitable law, No dark event to blast their hope foresaw ; But from gay Venice soon expect to steer For Britain's coast, and dread no perils near ; A thousand tender thoughts their souls employ, That fondly dance to scenes of future joy. Thus time elaps'd, while o'er the pathless tide Their ship thro' Grecian seas...
Page 109 - O unhappy chief! th' eternal doom Of Heaven decreed thee to the briny tomb! What scenes of misery torment thy view ! What painful struggles of thy dying crew! Thy perish'd hopes all buried in the flood, O'erspread with corses ! red with human blood!
Page 104 - The vessel, while the dread event draws nigh, Seems more impatient o'er the waves to fly. Fate spurs her on. Thus, issuing from afar, Advances to the sun some blazing star; And, as it feels th' attraction's kindling force, Springs onward with accelerated course.

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