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.No. 13.

fir.traB of a Letter from Mr. Secretary Dundas to Sir Charlet Grejf K. IS.; dated Whitehall, -Jth March 1794*

His Majesty is graciously pleased to approve of the phn suggested in Sir John Jervis and your joint letter, for the distribution of such booty as may'be taken in your expedition; nr.d 1 (hall take 1 the necessary measures for carrying the fame into effect.

No. 14.

Crfy rf a Letter from his Grace the Duie of Portland, to. the Agents or. behalf of the Iulalitauts and Proprietors of the Island of Martinique'; dated Whitehall, 30th April 4 795.

Gentlfmen, • Whitehall, 30th April 1795.

In answer to the Memorial which has been transmitted to me from- the Agents on behalf of the inhabitants and proprietors of the island of Martinique on the subject of certain proclamations issue d during the command of Sir Charles Grey and -Sir John Jcrvis in the West Indies, 1 beg leave to inform you, that his Majesty's ministers, the moment they were informed of the nature of those proclamations, sent directions respecting them, in consequence of which, no further procee dings were had upon them; and information has since been received, that those directions were so clearly understood, that the money which had been paid as contribution hab already been returned ; so that the proclamations in question cannot but be considered to be, as in fact they are, annulled.

I ain, &c.

■PORTLAND.

To the Agents on behalf of the •
inhabitants and proprietors of
the island of Martinique.

No. rj.

Copy of the Memorial of the Wcjl India Planters atLl Merchants /, dated London, May "4//', 1795. Received -ttb May, from Lord Penrhyn.

To his Grace the Duke of Portland, one of his Majesty's Principal Secretaries of State.

The Memorial of the West India Planters and Merchants; Sheweth, •

That your Memorialists are under the greatest alarm for the safety os the West India colonies, owing to the present weak state of their defence, and the very imminent dangers with which they are threatened, both by external attacks and the internal disTcmiiiaji titu of trench principles,

I That

That the system of general emancipation, introduced by the French among their own negroes, and which they have endeavoured to communicate to all the British islands, has created a very formidable accession of strength to themselves, as was lately experienced ia the island of Guadaloupe, and that temporary exertions of more than ■ordinary vigour, are thence become necessary for the defence and safety of those islands.

That your Memorialists cannot but, upon this occasion, advert to the representations they have so urgently made to his Majesty's Secretary of State, stating the consequences which might be expected to result from the unprecedented conduct of Sir Charles Grey and Sir John Jervis, on taking possession of the French captured islands; which conduct they must consider as the primary and efficient cause of the progress which the enemy has lately been enabled to make, whether in the recovery of a part of the French colonies, or in the plunder and devastation of our own: That your Memorialists fee in the late proclamations of the French commissioners not only a confirmation of this opinion, but great occasion to dread that the violent proceedings of the British commanders may be retorted with aggravated severity, whenever the fortune of war shall afford an opportunity; and that it is with deep regret your Memorialists now reflect that had an early and public disavowal of the proclamations and proceedings in question been made by the British Government, a great part of the recent calamities might have been prevented.

That from the late public events which have taken place in Europe, as well as from many local circumstances in the West Indies, yout Memorialists have reason to apprehend that the French nation will devote a considerable part ot its force, which has hitherto been employed upon other services, to the capture and devastation of the British West India colonies, being well aware of the immense advantages thence derived to the revenue, commerce, and naval strength of the British empire.

That the West India islands have, at all times, been greatly exposed to the calamities of war; but that the evils which they have reason to dread from a continuance os the present war are infinitely more disastrous than at any former period of their history, owing to the character pf the enemy they have to contend with, and the destructive tendency of the principles avowed and propagated by that enemy.

That in the judgment of your Memorialists, nothing can effectually guard against these complicated dangers but a strong military force, "both by sea and land, for the general protection of all the islands, 'and a separate garrison to be stationed during the war in each islands for its own peculiar defence.

In a situation of new and extreme danger, the existence of the British colonies at stake, and the lives and fortunes of the inhabitants depending on the issue; your Memorialists do therefore, in the most solemn manner, on behalf of those inhabitants! and themselves, appeal to the wisdom of his Majesty's councils for protection, and

Vol. III. 4D humbly humbly implore that if the war is likely to be continued, a force may be immediately sent to the different islands, sufficient as well to preserve their internal tranquillity, as to defend them against a foreign enemy, and (as essential to the protection and safety of the remaining British colonies) that the conduct of those British commanders, who assumed a right to levy a general contribution on the inhabitants of the French captured islands, or to confiscate their property, in contradiction to his Majesty's proclamation, may be solemnly and publicly disavowed.

No. 16.

Copy of a Letter from hit Grace the Duie of Portland to the Wtjt ^ India Merchant and Planters; dated Whitehall, I 2th May 1795.

Gentlemen, Whitehall, 12th May 179c.

I have received, through Lord Penrhyn, your Memorial, praying for a strong military force, both by sea and land, for the general protection os the British West India islands, and a separate garrison to be stationed in each island , also for a public disavowal of the proclamations issued during the command of Sir Charles Grey and Sir John Jervis.

The answer already given by Mr. Secretary Dundas, and the exertions which have been, and which continue to be, made for the protection of our West India possessions, render it unnecessary for me to dwell upon those parts of your Memorial which relate to the military supplies you require.

With regard to a public disavowal of the above proclamations, I cannot help referring to my letter to you of the 30th of April, as •ontaining the most direct and conclusive testimony of the sight in which those proclamations have been considered; the proceedings under them have been already countervailed, and I do not therefore see how they can serve even as a pretext to the French for executing the purposes which your Memorial suggests.

You must be well aware that it is not merely at this moment, but from the very commencement of the war, that the attempts of the French to carry anarchy and devastation into our West India islands, have been uniform and sy stematic; originating with themselveSj, and founded on those principles which have been openly avowed by them in that quarter of the world

I shall thertfore only add, that a general declaration of the nature of that requirr-d by the present Memorial, and involving in itsejf questions of the law of nations, cannot, with any degree of propriety, be made in the present case by his Majesty s ministers, acting as such, and nos in any judicial capacity.

I am, &c.

FORT/LAND.

West India Merchants, and Planters..

■: . ... ... N<v No. 17.

London, May 4th, 1795:

Memorial of the Wesl India Planters and Merchants; praying for a Jlrohg Military Force, both by Sea and Land, for the general ProteB 'ion of all the British West India Islands, and a separate Garrison to be stationed in each Island; also for a public Disa/vonual of the Proclamations issued by Sir Charles Grey aud Sir John Jervis.

To the Right Hon. Henry Dundas, one of his Majesty's Principal Secretaries of State.

The Memorial of the West India Planters and Merchants; Sheweth,

That your Memorialists are under the greatest alarm for the safety of the West India colonies, owing to the present weak state of their defence, and the very imminent dangers with which they are threatened, both by external attack, and the internal dissemination of French principles.

That the system of general emancipation introduced by the French among their own negroes, and which they have endeavoured to communicate to all the British islands, has created a very formidable accession of strength to themselves, as was lately experienced in the island of Guadaloupe; and that temporary exertions, of more than ordinary vigour, are thence become necessary for the defence and safety of those islands.

That your Memorialists cannot but, upon this occasions advert to the representations they have so urgently made to his Majesty's Secretary of State, stating the consequences which might be expected to result from the unprecedanted conduct of Sir Charles Grey and Sir John Jervis, on taking possession of the French captured islands; which conduct they must consider aS the primary and efficient cause of the progress which the enemy has lately been enabled to make« whether in the recovery of a part of the French colonies, or in the plunder or devastation of our own: That your Memorialists fee, in the late proclamations of the French commissioners, not only a confirmation of this opinion, but great occasion to dread that the violent proceedings of the British commanders may be retorted with aggravated severity, whenever the fortune of war (hall afford an opportunity; and that it is with deep regret your Memorialists now reflect, that had an early and public disavowal of the procla.ma» {ions and proceedings in question been made by the Britilh Government, a great part of the recent calamities might have been prevented.

That from the late public events which have taken place in Eu« rope, as well as from many local circumstances in the West Indies, your Memorialists have reason to apprehend that the French nation will devote a considerable part of its force, which has hitherto been employed upon'other services, to the capture and devastation of the British West India colonies, being well aware of the immense ad'

4. D 4 vantage* vantages thence derived to the revenue, commerce, and naval strength of the British empire.'

That the Welt India islands have at all times been greatly exposed to the calamities of war, but that the evils which they have reason to dread from a continuance of the present war, are infinitely more disastrous than at any former period of their history, owing to the character of the enemy they have to contend with, and the destructive tendency of the principles avowed and propagated by that enemy.

That, in the judgment of your Memorialists, nothing can effectually guard against these complicated dangers, but a strong military force, both by sea and land, for the general protection of all the islands, and a separate garrison to be stationed during the war in each island for its own particular defence.

In a situation of new and extreme danger, the existence of the British colonies at stake, and the lives and fortunes of the inhabitants depending on the issue; your Memorialists do therefore in the most solemn manner, on behalf of those inhabitants and themselves, appeal to the wisdom of his Majesty's councils for protection; and humbly implore that, if the war is likely to be continued, a force may be immediately sent to the different islands, sufficient as well to preserve their internal tranquillity as to defend them against a foreign enemy; and (as essential to the protection and safety of the remaining British colonies) that the conduct of those British commanders who assumed a right to levy a general contribution on the inhabitants of the French captured islands, or to confiscate their property, in contradiction to his Majesty's proclamation, may be solemnly and publicly disavowed.

No. 18.

Copy os a Letter from Mr. Secretary Dun J as to Lord Pcnrhyn; dated Horse Guards, Sti May 1795.

My Lord, Horse Guards, 8th May 1795.

I have received your Lordship's note, accompanying the Memorial of the West India planters and merchants, praying for a strong military force, both by sea and land, for the general protection of the British West India islands, and a separate garrison to be stationed in each island; also for a public disavowal of the proclamations issued by Sir Charles Grey and Sir John Jervis.

I feel much satisfaction in recollecting that at no period, since the commencement of the war, has there been any deficiency of exertions i;i furnishing the West India possessions with such a supply of both naval and military defence as the national force of the country would admit of; and if at any time these exertions have not, in all respects, had their complete effects, it has arisen from circumstance!, in which it is impossible to impute any blame to his Majesty's ministers; • These exertions will be unremitted; but you are aware , that, in sending reinforcements to the West Indies, the season of the • i, 3 y-at

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