Historiography and Imagination: Eight Essays on Roman Culture

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University of Exeter Press, 1994 - History - 167 pages
How did the Romans make sense of their own past? And how can we make sense of it, when the evidence for early Rome and the Republic is so inadequate? In this volume, Professor Wiseman focuses on some of the more unfamiliar aspects of the Roman experience, where the historian needs not just knowledge but imagination too. The first essay in the book, the 1993 Ronald Syme Lecture 'The Origins of Historiography', argues that dramatic performances at the public games were the medium through which the Romans in the 'pre-literary' period made sense of their own past. All Latin and Greek source material is translated.

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Contents

The Origins of Roman Historiography
1
Roman Legend and Oral Tradition
23
Monuments and the Roman Annalists
37
Lucretius Catiline and the Survival of Prophecy
49
Satyrs in Rome?
68
The Necessary Lesson
86
Conspicui postes tectaque digna
98
Abbreviations
117
Index
127
Figure i
145
Figure vi
154
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About the author (1994)

T. P. Wiseman is Emeritus Professor of Roman History at the University of Exeter and a Fellow of the British Academy. He came to Exeter in 1977, and was Head of Department from 1977 to 1990. His published books include Catullan Questions (1969), New Men in the Roman Senate (1971), Cinna the Poet (1974), Catullus and his World (1985), Roman Political Life (1985), and Remembering the Roman People (2009). And on the study of Roman historiography, and from there to the myth-history of early Rome: see Clio's Cosmetics (1979), Historiography and Imagination (1994), Remus: A Roman Myth (1995), Roman Drama and Roman History (1998), The Myths of Rome (2004), which won the American Philological Association's Goodwin Award of Merit, and Unwritten Rome (2008)

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