Readings in Political Philosophy

Front Cover
Francis William Coker
Macmillan, 1914 - Political science - 573 pages
Selections from Plato, Aristotle, Polybius, St. Thomas Aquinas, Dante, Marsiglio, Machiavelli, Calvin, the Vindiciae contra tyrannos, Bodin, Hooker, Grotius, Milton, Hobbes, Harrington, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Paine, and Bentham.
 

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Page 288 - Where there is much desire to learn, there of necessity will be much arguing, much writing, many opinions; for opinion in good men is but knowledge in the making.
Page 195 - And I charged your judges at that time, saying, Hear the causes between your brethren, and judge righteously between every man and his brother, and the stranger that is with him. Ye shall not respect persons in judgment ; but ye shall hear the small as well as the great : ye shall not be afraid of the face of man ; for the judgment is God's : and the cause that is too hard for you, bring it unto me, and I will hear it.
Page 195 - Thus saith the LORD ; Execute ye judgment and righteousness, and deliver the spoiled out of the hand of the oppressor : and do no wrong, do no violence to the stranger, the fatherless, nor the widow, neither shed innocent blood in this place.
Page 522 - Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one...
Page 176 - Talibus Ilioneus : cuncti simul ore fremebant Dardanidae. 560 Tum breviter Dido, vultum demissa, profatur : Solvite corde metum, Teucri ; secludite curas. Res dura et regni novitas me talia cogunt Moliri, et late fines custode tueri.
Page 280 - The Tenure Of Kings And Magistrates: Proving, That it is Lawful!, and hath been held so through all Ages, for any, who have the Power, to call to account a Tyrant, or wicked King, and after due conviction, to depose, and put him to death; if the ordinary Magistrate have neglected, or deny'd to doe it.
Page 304 - So that in the nature of man, we find three principal causes of quarrel. First, competition; secondly, diffidence; thirdly, glory. The first, maketh men invade for gain; the second, for safety; and the third, for reputation. The first use violence, to make themselves masters of other men's persons, wives, children, and cattle; the second, to defend them; the third, for trifles, as a word, a smile, a different opinion, and any other sign of undervalue, either direct in their persons, or by reflection...
Page 289 - For now the time seems come wherein Moses, the great prophet, may sit in heaven rejoicing to see that memorable and glorious wish of his fulfilled, when not only our seventy Elders, but all the Lord's people, are become prophets.
Page 288 - Why should we then affect a rigor contrary to the manner of God and of nature, by abridging or scanting those means which books freely permitted are, both to the trial of virtue and the exercise of truth? It would be better done to learn that the law must needs be frivolous which goes to restrain things uncertainly and yet equally working to good and to evil. And were I the chooser, a dram of well-doing should be preferred before many times as much the forcible hindrance of evildoing. For God sure...
Page 386 - The state of nature has a law of nature to govern it, which obliges every one; and reason, which is that law, teaches all mankind who will but consult it that, being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions.

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