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cheek, and gave his tears free vent—“it is not in this world that Heaven's justice ends. Think what it is, compared with the world to which her young spirit has winged its early flight, and say, if one deliberate wish, expressed in solemn tones above this bed, could call her back to life, which of us would utter it?”

She had been dead for two days. They were all about her at the time, knowing that the end was drawing on. She died soon after daybreak. They had read and talked to her in the earlier portion of the night; but as the hours crept on she sank to sleep. They could tell, by what she faintly uttered in her dreams, that they were of her wanderings with the old man. They were of no painful scenes, but of those who had helped them and used them kindly; for she often said, "God bless you!" with great fervour. Waking, she never wandered in her mind but once, and that was at beautiful music which, she said, was in the air. God knows. It may have been.

Opening her eyes at last from a very quiet sleep, she begged that they would kiss her once again.

That done, she turned to the old mau, with a lovely smile upon her face—such, they said, as they had never seen, and never could forget,--and clung with both her arms about his neck. She had never murmured or complained, but with a quiet mind, and manner quite unaltered- -save that she every day became more earnest and more grateful, to them-faded, like the light upon the summer's evening.

Earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust. Many a young hand dropped in its little wreath,—many a stifled sob was heard. Some, and they were not a few, knelt down. All were sincere and truthful in their sorrow. The service done, the mourners stood apart, and the villagers closed round to look into the grave before the stone should be replaced.

One called to mind how he had seen her sitting on that very spot, and how her book had fallen on her lap, and she was gazing with a pensive face upon the sky. Another told how he had wondered much that one so delicate as she should be so bold; how she had never feared to enter the church alone at night, but had loved to linger there when all was quiet, and even to climb the tower-stair, with no more light than that of the moon rays stealing through the loopholes in the thick old walls. A whisper went about among the oldest there that she had seen and talked with angels; and when they called to mind how she had looked and spoken, and her early death, some thought it might be so indeed.

Thus, coming to the grave, in little knots, and glancing down, and giving place to others, and falling off in whispering groups of three or four, the church was cleared in time of all but the sexton and the mourning friends. Then, when the dusk of evening had come on, and not a sound disturbed the sacred stillness of the place—when the bright moon poured in her light, on tomb and monument, on pillar, wall, and arch, and most of all, it seemed, to them, upon her quiet grave—in that calm time, when all outward things and inward thoughts teem with assurances of immortality, and worldly hopes and fears are humbled in the dust before them, then with tranquil and submissive hearts they turned away, and left the child with God.Dickens.

SOUND OF THE LETTER R.

The R must not trilled in the middle of words, and only when it precedes

a vowel as in Rum, Bride, Drum, Strength, &c. (60.) The earth was without form and void. To the pure

all things are pure. He obtained pardon from the warden. Blessed are the merciful for they shall obtain mercy. Virtue lends a zest to joy, and bliss to rapture warms, our very tears she turns to smiles, and every pang disarms; but vice her foul circean cup may medicate in vain, e'en in her mirth some sorrow lurks, in all her pleasures pain. Note well the term, and when the notice of the farm expires. What's perfect on poor earth? Well sounding verses are the charm we use, heroic thoughts and virtue to infuse.

PRONUNCIATION OF SENTENCES.

(61.) When you have by practice attained a clear articulation, turn your attention to the pronunciation of sentences, giving to each word its proper

sound. Pronunciation is a matter of taste, and is changed frequently with the fashion. In cases of doubt the best reference will be found in the most modern pronouncing dictionaries. The twelve following Rules comprise the elementary principles which constitute good, clear, and sensible reading, and you should now proceed to learn them in their order, and practise carefully the accompanying Exercises.

PRACTICAL RULES FOR LEARNERS.

RULE I.

Finish each word distinctly, and sound first and last syllables in most cases as they are spelt. The exceptions are terminations as ine, ly, ile, ion, une, age, ime, aux, ry, ive, &c,

EXERCISES ON RULE I.

(62.) ON CONSONANTS, The heights, depths, lengths, and breadths of the subject. The flag of freedom floats once more aloft. It was decidedly the severest storm of the season. Around the rugged rocks, the ragged rascal ran. He sawed six long, slim, sleek, slender saplings. Slowly and sadly we laid him down from the field of his fame, fresh and gory. Americans say that the best of all governments in this badly governed world, is the republican government. When the world is dark with tempests, when thunders roll and lightnings fly, thou lookest in thy beauty from the clouds. He spoke disinterestedly, reasonably, philosophically, particularly, peremptorily, authoritatively, unhesitatingly, and extemporaneously. Acts, chaise, Copts, fifths, judged, knitting, laurel, literal, literally, literary, literarily, peacock, quick, railroad, raillery, rural, ruler, sash, sashes, sects, sixths, statistics, vivification.

(63.) ON SYLLABLES. The captain was reading in the cabin, whilst the ship was swiftly sailing; his commands were obeyed implicitly, for all had faith in his government. They were of humble birth, but of happy dispositions. Tears afforded the girl but little relief as she sat beneath the willow. We should suspend judgment till both sides of the case are heard. The traveller returned once more to his disconsolate family, and the desolate hearth again was warmed by his smile. It was a fatal blow to his children when they heard of his project, although they knew him to be fearless under all dangers. No one approved of his course of conduct, all feared it would compromise his reputation; his family modestly remained silent. The history of his former campaigns rendered it probable that the products of his labour would be but small. His wife was thrifty, and the happiness of the household consisted in their projects for the welfare of others. They sat together in the feeble rays of a February sun, and as the hour of separation drew on apace, each felt the pain of parting increased, the boys silently pressed his horny hands, his daughters kissed his furrowed cheeks; his quivering lips and pallid brow told of his inward struggle, of the depth of that emotion, which was too powerful for utterance.

Five wives weave withes. Such pranks Franks's prawns play in the tank. Put the cut pumpkin in a pipkin. Pick pepper peacock. Coop up the cook. A knapsack strap. Pick up the pips. A school coalscuttle. Six thick thistle sticks. A sure sign of sunshine. The sun shines on the shop signs. A shot-silk sash-shop. I snuff shop snuff; do you snuff shop snuff? She sells sea-shells. Some shun sunshine. A rural ruler. Truly rural. Laurel-crowned clown. Literally literary. Don't run along the wrong lane. Let little Nelly run. The coal ground was cold ground. You could see the panting spirit sigh in the panting spirit's eye. Be the same in thy known desire as thou art in thine own desire. There is a torment in a never-meddling and an ever-meddling man. Both sex of the sects were outrageous. He was a sad dangler and a sad angler. Abel an able man, and with his axe acts the part of a legislator to the legislature. Not as a willing captor he made the capture of the artless among the heartless. All the assistance he received was from assistants, cowards and cowherds. His horse was led by the bridle to the bridal, he looking plaintive as a discomfited plaintiff. So he placed the precious relic in the relict's hands, which the sentry had treasured for a century. The water, meanwhile, was seen to ooze from a crevice, which gap had been stopped by the witch. She had been exorcised, and exercised by the pastor on the pasture. Abel thus able was elected president as a precedent, and proceeded to weigh the whey as regimen tried. The magnate proved thus no magnet to their esteem, and accordingly they lashed his team, causing steam to rise to her eyes.

“Mines of wealth could not sway the minds of mine own known people,” cried the popular man as he stood under the poplar, caring little whether or not the weather whirled him to another world, for he felt nothing could lower his lore, and he knew he was the principal man in the principal city where the prince palled of his pleasures. “I will not,” said he, “meddle with the medal which in the matin was placed on the matting near the mat in the room.” The mayor then mounted the mare, soothed with, sooth to say, the liniment which covered his lineaments—the unconscious innocents in their innocence airily cheering his hairy steed. They then chanted a ballad, the wivner being decided by ballot, and of the idle fellow they made an idol, in a manner more wholly than holy in those islands which were near the Highlands. Some gambled, others gambolled, and corals being giving to the choral, one was seized with coughing enough to suggest for such chest a coffin. Juvenal, who was not juvenile, looked gluttonous through his glutinous skin; he laughed at the jester, who by his gesture mimicked a juggler severing the jugular of an imposture as great as the impostor.

RULE II.

Sound the last letter of one word before attempting the next.

EXERCISES ON RULE II.

(64.) In peril's darkest hour-in peril's darkest tower. He built him an ice house--in a nice house. My heart is awed within me-my heart is sawed within me. A great error that—a great terror, often exists. He is not content in either situation--but in neither situation. My brothers ought to owe nothing—and they sought to own nothing. We travelled o'er fields of ice, sand, snow-we travelled o'er, fields of vice and snow, of waste, sand, deserts, and wastes, and deserts. We discovered an egress, and a negress there. His cry moved me as much as his crime moved me. He looked on this pot, and on this spot. As the chaste stars gazed on the chased tars. A notion exists, that an ocean exists. Boys are apt, when they are rapt, to be rapped on the knuckles for inattention.

(65.) ON WORDS FREQUENTLY MISPRONOUNCED.

The Commit'tee decided that the movement was accept'able, and willingly recognized him as a coad'jutor. They determined to ad'vertise the Company, and an advert'isement was accordingly inserted, but it was contrary to the feelings of the complai'sant Secretary, who did not con'template such a proceeding. Not being con'versant with their plan, his objections were not considered dec'orous, and he was stigmatised as a fanat'ic and im'becile; they were the machin'ists of their own destruction. His conduct was ex'emplary, their behaviour lam'entable. None could panegyrise their proceedings, and the revenue of their profits exposed their folly.

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