The Miscellaneous Works of Edward Gibbon, Esq: With Memoirs of His Life and Writings, Volume 1

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Contents

Character of Mr William Law
20
The Author is sent to Dr Wooddesons School whence he
31
Is entered at Westminster School is removed on account
36
Dr Waldegrave his Tutor at Oxford to E Gibbon
37
Mémoire sur la Monarchie des Mèdes pour servir de Sup
56
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd on the Affairs
64
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd on the Test
74
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd on the Death
81
The Authors Account of the Books he read and of
87
On the Character of Brutus Date uncertain
95
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd Dec 11th 1772
96
Mr Gibbon makes the Tour of Switzerland forms a Cor
97
Italy c 1760 38
98
Some Account of Mademoiselle Curchod afterwards
105
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd at Edinburgh
109
On Mr Hurds Commentary on Horace Written Feb 1762
113
Mr Gibbon to Mr FolroydAccount of
120
Mr Mallet to Mr Gibbon inclosing a Letter from
125
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd on Parliamentary
133
The Authors manner of passing his time in the Hampshire
134
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd Politicalon sending
139
Mr Whitaker to Mr Gibbon thanking Mr Gibbon
145
Les Principales Epoques de lHistoire de la Grèce et
150
Dr Jos Warton to Mr Gibbon on the first Volume
152
Nomina Gentesque Antiquæ Italiæ Written 1763 1764
155
The Author passes some time at Paris gives an Account
158
Mr Gibbon to Mr HolroydMadame Neckers
164
Dr Campbell of Aberdeen to Mr Strahan
168
Extrait de trois Mémoires de M LAbbé de la Bleterie
169
Alpes et Gentes Inalpinæ et Flumen
171
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd mentioning
174
meniMr Ilumes Opinion
176
Remarques Critiques sur le Nombre des Habitans dans
178
tance Nov 2d 1776
180
Gouvernement Féodal surtout en France Date uncertain
183
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd on the American Affairs
192
Mr Gibbon to Mr HolroydAccount of the Cap
199
Relation des Noces de Charles Duc de Bourgogne avec
202
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd Account of his Situa
208
Mr Gibbon to Mr HolroydAmerican Affairs
209
Mr Gibbon to Mr HolroydAccount of his
215
Mr Gibbon settles in Londonbegins his History of
217
An Account of a Letter addressed to Cocchi by Chevalier
222
Mr Gibbon to Mr HolroydAmerican Affairs
223
Dr Robertson to Mr Gibbon on Mr Gibbons
229
An Examination of Mallets Introduction to the History
231
Madame de Genlis to Mr Gibbon with a Copy
235
Introduction à lHistoire générale de la République
239
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Gibbon on the same Subject
241
Dr Robertson to Mr Gibbon on the two new
249
Sir Wm Jones to Mr GibbonSir Wm Joness
252
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield on his Departure
311
Mr Gibbon to Lord offering to accept
317
An Inquiry whether a Catalogue of the Armies sent into
323
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield on his Depar
324
Narrative continued by Lord ShelfeldAccount of Lord
327
Mr Gibbon to Lord SheffieldM Deyverdun
328
Remarques touchant les Doutes Historiques sur la Vie et
331
Mr Gibbon to Lord SheffieldComparison
334
An Examination of the Catalogue of Silius Italicus 24th
335
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Portenbis Friendship with
340
A Minute Examination of Horaces Journey to Brundusium
346
Mr Gibbon to Lord SheffieldPoliticalMr
347
Mr Gibbon visits M Neckerthe Company he there meets
353
On the Fasti of Ovid Written 1764
354
Mr Gibbon to Mrs GibbonAccount of his
355
Invasion of Savoy by the French Army under M de Mon
356
Mr Gibbon to Lady Sheffieldeminent Persons
365
Mr Gibbons Letter to the Honourable Miss Holroyd
368
Mr Gibbon to Lady Elizabeth Foster now
372
Mr Gibbon to Lord SheffieldContentment with
374
Revolution at GenevaGreat Britain happily adheres
384
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield Jan 17th 1786
387
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield Affecting Letter
388
On the Triumphal Shows and Ceremonies 13th Dec 1764
394
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield on the three lastVo
395
Lady Sheffields Death and Mr Gibbons immediate resolu
397
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield on the Conclusion
401
1794
404
de Jules César
408
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield Attack of Gout
411
Madame Necker à M GibbonContrast of
416
Lord North to Mr Gibbon with Thanks for
418
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Gibbon on the Riots in Lon
420
Dr Robertson to Mr Gibbon with Thanks for
424
Narrative continued by Lord SheffieldMr Gibbons social
428
Introduction to the Letters
431
Professor Heyné to M Gibbon recommending
439
Remarques sur quelques Endroits de Virgile April 1757
441
Madame Necker à M Gibbon on the Disputes
443
Madame Necker à M Gibbonthe Prince
449
Madame Necker à M Gibbon on Mr Gibbons
454
I Professor Breitinger to Vr Gibbonon ditlerent
456
Madame Necker à M GibbonAffairs of
460
Critical Observations on the Design of the Sixth Book of
467
Mr Gibbon to Lady Elizabeth FosterDeath
483
Dr Vincent to Mr Gibbon on the same Subject
489
Mr Gibbon to Lord Auckland St Jamess
495
Dr Cooke to Mr Gibbon with Thanks for a Pre
498
mer
502
Postscript to Ditto
510
Mr Gibbon 10 M Gesner the same Subject con
515

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Page 6 - Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm in erecting a grammar school; and whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used, and, contrary to the king, his crown and dignity, thou hast built a paper-mill.
Page 212 - That the influence of the crown had increased, was increasing, and ought to be diminished"; and Mr.
Page 194 - The style of an author should be the image of his mind, but the choice and command of language is the fruit of exercise. Many experiments were made before I could hit the middle tone between a dull chronicle and a rhetorical declamation: three times did I compose the first chapter, and twice the second and third, before I was tolerably satisfied with their effect.
Page 122 - ... thorough profligate in principle as in practice, his life stained with every vice. and his conversation full of blasphemy and indecency. These morals he glories in — for shame is a weakness he has long since surmounted. He told us himself, that in this time of public dissension he was resolved to make his fortune.
Page 198 - The favour of mankind is most freely bestowed on a new acquaintance of any original merit; and the mutual surprise of the public and their favourite is productive of those warm sensibilities, which at a second meeting can no longer be rekindled. If I listened to the music of praise, I was more seriously satisfied with the approbation of my judges. The candour of Dr. Robertson embraced his disciple. A letter from Mr. Hume overpaid the labour of ten years, but I have never presumed to accept a place...
Page 176 - After a sleepless night, I trod, with a lofty step, the ruins of the Forum; each memorable spot where Romulus stood, or Tully spoke, or Caesar fell, was at once present to my eye; and several days of intoxication were lost or enjoyed before I could descend to a cool and minute investigation.
Page 221 - He seemed to feel, and even to envy, the happiness of my situation while I admired the powers of a superior man, as they are blended in his attractive character with the softness and simplicity of a child.
Page 35 - The fellows or monks of my time were decent easy men, who supinely enjoyed the gifts of the founder : their days were filled by a scries of uniform form employments; the chapel and the hall, the coffee-house and the common room, till they retired, -weary and well satisfied, to a long slumber. From the toil of reading, or thinking, or writing, they had absolved their conscience...
Page liv - A lively desire of knowing and of recording our ancestors so generally prevails, that it must depend on the influence of some common principle in the minds of men.
Page 178 - It was at Rome, on the 15th of October 1764, as I sat musing amidst the ruins of the Capitol, while the barefooted friars were singing vespers in the temple of Jupiter,* that the idea of writing the decline and fall of the city first started to my mind.

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