Two Treatises of Government: With a Supplement, Patriarcha, by Robert Filmer

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Simon and Schuster, 1947 - Political Science - 311 pages

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In the Second Treatises of Government, John Locke sets forward the history of how governments came into being. First they started out in a state of nature following the law of nature. They started as ... Read full review

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Locke's Two Treatises of Government surprisingly lived up to my expectations. He argues in two parts: 1) apologists for monarchical governments are wrong and 2) the people of a society are the ones ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter
7
Chatter Page IV Of Slavery
132
Of Property
133
Of Paternal Power
146
Of Political or Civil Society
159
Of the Beginning of Political Societies
168
Or the Ends of Political Society and Govern ment
184
Of the Forms of a Commonwealth
186
Of Fatherhood and Property Considered
vii
Selected Bibliography xl
xl
Chapter
7
THE SECOND TREATISE OF CIVIL GOVERNMENT
119
Of Conquest 210
210
Of Usurpation 221
221
Of Tyranny 222
222
Of the Dissolution of Government 228
228

Of the Extent of the Legislative Power
188
Of the Legislative Executive and Federative Power of the Commonwealth
194
Of the Subordination of the Powers of the Commonwealth
196
Of Prerogative
203
Of Paternal Political and Despotical Power
208
CONSLDERED TOGETHER
vi
PATRIARCHA
249
That the Flrst Kings were Fathers of Families 251
251
It is Unnatural for the People to Govern or Choose Governors 260
260
Positive Laws do not Infringe the Natural and Fatherly Power of Kings 281
281
Note on Sir Robert Filmer 309
309
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About the author (1947)

John Locke's works of political and social philosophy, written in the 17th century, have strongly influenced intellectuals ever since - including the founders of the United States of America. Born in 1632 in Wrington, England, Locke studied at Christ Church, Oxford, where he earned his B.A. and M.A. degrees in the late 1650's. He also studied medicine and earned a medical license. His studies led to an interest in contemporary philosophers influenced by science, such as Rene Descartes. Locke read widely among them while teaching at Christ Church over the next few years. In 1667, Locke became personal physician and adviser to Anthony Ashley Cooper, who later was appointed Earl of Shaftesbury. Through Shaftesbury's patronage, Locke earned some government posts and entered London's intellectual circles, all the while writing philosophy. He was one of the best-known European thinkers of his time when he died in 1704. In An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), Locke established the philosophy of empiricism, which holds that the mind at birth is a blank tablet. Experience, Locke believed, would engrave itself upon the tablet as one grew. He felt humans should create theories according to experience and test them with experiments. This philosophy helped establish the scientific method. Locke codified the principals of liberalism in "Two Treatises of Government" (1690). He emphasized that the state must preserve its citizens' natural rights to life, liberty and property. When the state does not, Locke argued, citizens are justified in rebelling. His view of liberalism comprised limited government, featuring elected representation and legislative checks and balances. While a Christian, Locke believed in absolute separation of church and state, and he urged toleration of those whose religious views differed from the majorities.

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