The Journal of the Royal Institution of Great Britain, Volume 1

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Contents

Contributions to the Physiology of Vision No I
101
Description of the Horns of the Prussian Elk Difference between
118
Analysis of New Books
142
Page
150
Anatomical Investigation of the Structure of the Eyes in Insects
152
On the Power of Horses B Bevan Esq
159
Size for Illuminators Artists c
165
On Pyrophosphoric Acid and the Pyrophosphates
167
Production of Hydrocyanic Prussic Acid under uncommon circum stances A A Hayes 16g 5 Action of Chlorine on Carburetted Hydrogen Alcohol a...
169
Bromide of Carbon
171
Preparation of Phosphuret of Lime Dr Coxe
173
Ammonia in Native Oxide of Iron Boussingault
174
Atomic Weight of Titanium Rose
175
On the Crystallization of Gold Professor Henslow of Cambridge
176
Salicineits power as a Febrifuge Lcroux
177
Preparation and Composition of Malic Acid
178
Ulmin or Ulraic Acid and Azulmic Acid
179
On Caseum and Milk Braconnot
181
Manufacture of Charcoal
184
NATURAL HISTORY
185
Use of Nitrogen in RespirationCyanogen in the Blood
186
On the Disorders arising from the longcontinued Use of Iodine Dr Jahn
187
Chlorine an Antidote to Hydrocyanic Acid
188
On the Cure of Animal Poisons and probably Hydrophobia by the local Application of Common Salt Rev J Fischer
189
On Restoration from Drowning by Insufflation of the Lungs
190
Surgical Recovery of an Eye
191
On the Means of improving both the Quality and Quantity of Wool M Petri
192
Vision of Birds of Prey Dr J Johnson ib 12 New Species of British Snake
193
Antipathy of the Chameleon to Black
194
Phosphorescence of the Sea in the Gulf of St Lawrence ib 16 Rending of Timber by Lightning
195
Protfaction of Vegetable Life in a dry State
196
Peculiar Fall of Snow Mr Sherriff
198
Influence bf the Age of Parents on the Sex of Children
199
Precautions in the Planting of Potatoes ib 25 Preservation of frozen Potatoes
200
Mirage of Central India i
201
Village lighted by Natural Gas
203
Singular Natural Sound
204
On a peculiar class of Optical Deceptions By M Faraday F R S
205
Description of a Mode of erecting light Vaults over Churches
224
Account of a New Comet observed by M Dabadie
241
On the ElectroChemical Decomposition of the VegetoAlkaline
250
Observations on Mr Rennies Paper on the peculiar Habits
261
Further Experiments on the Communication of Phosphorescence
267
On the Darkness between the Primary and Secondary Rainbows
281
On the Mode of Ascertaining the Commercial Value of Ores
293
A Mode of Regulating the Supply of Water between Intersecting
307
On the First Invention of Telescopes collected from the Notes
319
Feb 1831
333
Life of Sir Humphry Davy Bart LL D late President of the Royal
347
Plantae Asiaticae Rariores or Descriptions and Figures of a select
360
FOREIGN AND MISCELLANEOUS INTELLIGENCE
368
Force of Terrestrial Magnetism
374
Compression of Fluids Professor Oersted
375
Peculiar Appearance of Saturns Ring
376
On the Decomposition of Metallic Salts by the Voltaic Pile and on the state of Chlorides Iodides c in solution
377
Voltaic Test of the State of Metals
378
Powerful Electromagnet constructed by Professor Moll
379
Laws of Electrical Accumulation
380
On the Emission of Light during the Compression of Gases
381
On Oxamidc a Substance which approximates to some Animal Bodies M Dumas
382
Preparation of Nitrogen Professor Einmetr
384
Action of mixed Nitrate and Muriate of Ammonia on Glass
385
Pulverization of Phosphorus ibid 12 Inflammation of Phosphorus by Charcoal ibid 13 Preparation of BiCarbonate of Soda ibid 14 Rock Salt in Arm...
386
Preparation of Lithia QuesncvilleTs ibid 16 On the Submuriates of Iron and other Subsalts Mr Phillips
387
On the Reaction of Persalts of Iron and Neutral C arbonates
388
On discoloured Chloride of Silver M Cavalier ibid 21 Composition of Fulminating Gold
394
On Magnesium Justus Liebig
411
NATURAL HISTORY 1 Formation of Hail
415
On the Thermal Waters of Chaudes Aigues in the Department du Cantal M Chevalier
417
Humboldts Account of the Gold and Platina District of Russia
418
Parrots Expedition to Ararat
419
Smut in Com
420
Structure of Leaves
421
Crystals of Oxalate of Lime in Plants
422
Growth of Vegetables ibid 11 On Circulation in Vegetables
424
Seat of the Sense of Taste
425
Remarkable Case of the Reunion of a divided Part ibid 15 Singular Effect of Opium
426
To restore the Elasticity of a damaged Feather
427
Ornithology ibid 20 Ichthyology
429
Description of some Atmospheric Phenomena Prof Strehlke of Daniig
432
On the Produce of Gold and Silver in the Russian Empire Alex von Humboldt
434
On the Change which the Air in Eggs undergoes during Incubation Professor Dulk of Kiinigsberg
435
On the Employment of Notation in Chemistry By the Rev
437
On the Plant intended by the Shamrock of Ireland By I
453
An Account of a Remarkable Instance of Anomalous Structure
476
On the First Invention of Telescopes c By Dr G Moll
483
On the Contrivances of some Animals to secure Warmth
496
On the Aurora Borealis of the 7th of January 1831 By Dr Moll
519
On the Height above the Surface of the Earth of a Luminous Arch
525
On Elaterium and a New Principle obtained from it by Analysis
532
On the RippleMarks and Tracks of certain Animals in the Forest
538
Proceedings of the Royal Institution of Great Britain
547
Proceedings of the Academy of Sciences in Paris
558
Analysis of Books and Selections from the Transactions of Scientific Societies Life of Sir Humphry Davy Bart LL D
571
Acta Academite Cses Leop Carol Naturae Curiosae Bonne
585
Memoirs of the Institute of France
597
FOREIGN AND MISCELLANEOUS INTELLIGENCE y 1 MECHANICAL SCIENCE I Stiffness and Strength of Timber
599
Optical Deception upon the Liverpool and Manchester Rail Road
600
A Barometer of a new Construction Proposed by M Kupffer G01 7 Occupation ibid 8 Pendulum Observations
602
Dip of the Magnetic Needle at St Petersburgh
604
Variation of the Needle
607
New Dipping Needle
608
Powerful ElectroMagnets
609
On the Intensity of the Earths Magnetism Kupffer
610
CHEMICAL SCIENCE 1 Matteuci on the Origin of the Action of the Voltaic Pile
612
Conducting Powers of Liquified Gases K T Kemp
613
On the Preparation of Iodic Acid Serullas
614
On the Precipitation of the VegetoAlkalies by Iodic Acid Serullas
615
On Perchloric Acid and its Facil Formation Serullas
616
On the Spontaneous Inflammation of Pulverized Charcoal Aubcrt
617
Power of Carbon to destroy the Bitterness of certain Bodies
619
On the Compounds of Ammouia with Anhydrous Salts H Rose
620
Test of the Protoxide and Peroxide of Iron Berzelius
624
A new Metal Vanadium associated with Iron Sefstrbra
625
Combustion of an Alloy of Tin and Lead B W Fox
626
Vauquelins Process for obtaining Metallic Chromium ibid 16 On the Absorption of Oxygen at High Temperatures by Silver GayLussac
627
Robiquet on a new Metallic Dye
628
Purple Precipitate of Silver Gold c c ibid 19 CSnometeror Alcohometer M Emile Tabaric
629
On the Manufacture of Sulphuric Ether C Wittstock ibid 21 On Columbine a New Vegetable Principle M Wittstock
630
On the Composition of Camphor and Camphoric Acid J Liebig
631
Use of Mica in miuute Chemical Analyses
633
NATURAL HISTORY
635
Structure of Leaves
636
Germination of Seeds at the Surface of Mercury
637
Fertilisation of Plants ibid 5 Structure of the Radish Root
638
Medicinal Use and Effect of the Ava Root
639
Mexican Domestic Bees Melipona Beechei
640
Mean Meteorological Results
641
Climate of England
642
On the Earthquake at Odessa on the 26th of November 1829
643
Geography of Siberia
644
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656

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Page 343 - Commission, when it ordered the killing of the "wild well." The object of the present paper is to give an account of the...
Page 610 - Henry suggests in explanation, that "a current from a trough possesses more 'projectile' force (to use Professor Hare's expression,) and approximates somewhat in 'intensity' to the electricity from the common machine. May it not also be a fact that the galvanic fluid in order to produce the greatest magnetic effect should move with a...
Page 576 - At the same time that he thus gratified my desires as to scientific employment, he still advised me not to give up the prospects I had before me, telling me that Science was a harsh mistress ; and, in a pecuniary point of view, but poorly rewarding those who devoted themselves to her service.
Page 456 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them; they looked like anatomies of death ; they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves; they did eat the dead carrions, happy where they could find them...
Page 358 - Natural electricity has hitherto been little investigated, except in the case of its evident and powerful concentration in the atmosphere. Its slow and silent operations in every part of the surface...
Page 575 - When I was a bookseller's apprentice, I was very fond of experiment, and very averse to trade. It happened that a gentleman, a member of the Royal Institution, took me to hear some of Sir H. Davy's last lectures in Albemarle Street. I took notes, and afterwards wrote them out more fairly in a quarto volume. My desire to escape from trade, which I thought vicious and selfish, and to enter into the service of Science, which I imagined made its pursuers amiable and liberal, induced me...
Page 195 - ... were distinctly visible. Day broke very slowly, and the sun rose of a fiery and threatening aspect. Rain followed. Captain Bonnycastle caused a bucket of this fiery water to be drawn up : it was one mass of light, when stirred by the hand, and not in sparks, as usual, but in actual coruscations.
Page 457 - They willingly eat the herb Shamrock, being of a sharp taste, which, as they run and are chased to and fro, they snatch like beasts out of the ditches.
Page 456 - ... and if they found a plot of water-cresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast for the time, yet not able to continue there withal; that in short space there were none almost left, and a most populous and plentiful country suddenly left void of man and beast."*** The authors of this calamity reaped from it the expected fruits.
Page 22 - I saw it distinctly, more than once, put out its short leg while on the wing, and by a bend of the head, deliver somewhat into its mouth. If it takes any part of its prey with its foot, as I have now the greatest reason to suppose it does these chafers, I no longer wonder at the use of its middle toe, which is curiously furnished with a serrated claw...

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