Parliamentary Papers, Volume 30

Front Cover
H.M. Stationery Office, 1853 - Bills, Legislative
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Page 368 - It faded on the crowing of the cock. Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, The bird of dawning singeth all night long : And then, they say, no spirit dare stir abroad; The nights are wholesome; then no planets strike, No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm, So hallow'd and so gracious is the time.
Page 372 - twas wild. But thou, O HOPE ! with eyes so fair, What was thy delighted measure? Still it whispered promised pleasure, And bade the lovely scenes at distance hail...
Page 381 - The sum of the angles of a spherical triangle is greater than two and less than six right angles ; that is, greater than 180 and less than 540. (gr). If A'B'C' is the polar triangle of ABC...
Page 370 - Therefore, no doubt, the sovereignty of man lieth hid in knowledge; wherein many things are reserved, which kings with their treasure cannot buy, nor with their force command; their spials and intelligencers can give no news of them, their seamen and discoverers cannot sail where they grow: now we govern nature in opinions, but we are thrall unto her in necessity; but if we would be led by her in invention, we should command her in action.
Page 370 - Thy milder influence impart, Thy philosophic Train be there To soften, not to wound my heart. The gen'rous spark extinct revive, Teach me to love and to forgive, Exact my own defects to scan, What others are, to feel, and know myself a Man.
Page 369 - But, look, the morn in russet mantle clad, Walks o'er the dew of yon high eastern hill.
Page 377 - To divide a given straight line into two parts, so that the rectangle contained by the whole, and one of the parts, shall be equal to the square of the other part.
Page 371 - Muse, The place of fame and elegy supply: And many a holy text around she strews, That teach the rustic moralist to die. For who, to dumb forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing anxious being e'er resign'd, Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Nor cast one longing lingering look behind?
Page 397 - ... the province of poetry is to describe nature and passion, which are always the same, the first writers took possession of the most striking objects for description and the most probable occurrences for fiction, and left nothing to those that followed them but transcription of the same events and new combinations of the same images.
Page 371 - A voice as of the cherub-choir Gales from blooming Eden bear, And distant warblings lessen on my ear That lost in long futurity expire.

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