A comparative view of the social life of England and France: from the restoration of Charles the Second, to the French Revolution

Front Cover
Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1828 - England - 462 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 458 - Semper ardentes acuens sagittas Cote cruenta. Adde quod pubes tibi crescit omnis, Servitus crescit nova, nec priores Impiae tectum dominae relinquunt Saepe minati Te suis matres metuunt juvencis, Te senes parci miseraeque nuper Virgines nuptae, tua ne retardet Aura maritos.
Page 264 - I dissemble very ill to those who know me, at least 'tis a great constraint to myself, yet I must endure it. All my motions are so watched, and all I do so observed, that if I eat less, or speak less, or look more grave, all is lost in the opinion of the world...
Page 21 - ... never all worth when new five pounds. His house was perfectly of the old fashion, in the midst of a large park well stocked with deer, and near the house rabbits to serve his kitchen, many fish-ponds...
Page 441 - Saw every court, heard every king declare His royal sense of operas or the fair...
Page 22 - This last supplied him with red deer, sea and river fish; and indeed all his neighbours' grounds and royalties were free to him, who bestowed all his time in such sports, but what he borrowed to caress his neighbours' wives and daughters, there being not a woman in all his walks of the degree of a yeoman's wife or under, and under the age of forty, but it was extremely her fault if he were not intimately acquainted with her.
Page 21 - Forest and the manor of Christ Church. This last supplied him with red deer, sea and river fish; and indeed all his neighbours...
Page 302 - Lord Bolingbroke has both a tongue and a pen to persuade ; his manner of speaking in private conversation is full as elegant as his writings ; whatever subject he either speaks or writes upon, he adorns it with the most splendid eloquence ; not a studied or laboured eloquence, but such a flowing happiness of diction, which (from care perhaps at first) is become so habitual to him, that even his most familiar conversations, if taken down in writing, would bear the Press, without the least correction...
Page 23 - Martyrs; on the tables were hawks' hoods, bells, and such like, two or three old green hats with their crowns thrust in so as to hold ten or a dozen eggs, which were of a...
Page 23 - ... lying by his trencher that he might defend such meat as he had no mind to part with to them. The windows, which were very large, served for places to lay his arrows, crossbows, stonebows, and other such like accoutrements; the corners of the room full of the best chose hunting and hawking poles; an oyster-table at the lower end...
Page 104 - I confess I could give her little joy, and so I plainly told her, but she said the King would have it so, and there was no going back.

Bibliographic information