Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 72

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William Blackwood, 1852 - England

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Page 382 - What though the field be lost? All is not lost; the unconquerable will, And study of revenge, immortal hate, And courage never to submit or yield, And what is else not to be overcome ; That glory never shall his wrath or might Extort from me.
Page 134 - OF man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly Muse...
Page 382 - Who from the terror of this arm so late Doubted his empire, that were low indeed; That were an ignominy and shame beneath This downfall; since by fate the strength of gods And this empyreal* substance cannot fail; Since through experience of this great event In arms not worse, in foresight much advanced, We may with more successful hope resolve To wage by force or guile eternal war Irreconcilable to our grand foe, Who now triumphs, and in the excess of joy Sole reigning holds the tyranny of Heaven.
Page 154 - There wanted yet the master work, the end Of all yet done ; a creature who, not prone And brute as other creatures, but endued With sanctity of reason, might erect His stature, and upright with front serene Govern the rest, self-knowing, and from thence 510 Magnanimous to correspond with Heaven...
Page 382 - He with his thunder : and till then who knew The force of those dire arms ? yet not for those, Nor what the potent Victor in his rage Can else inflict, do I repent or change...
Page 387 - Like night, and darken'd all the land of Nile : So numberless were those bad angels seen Hovering on wing under the cope of hell, 'Twixt upper, nether, and surrounding fires ; Till, as a signal given the...
Page 391 - But what will not ambition and revenge Descend to ? Who aspires, must down as low As high he soar'd ; obnoxious, first or last, To basest things.
Page 374 - Him the Almighty Power Hurled headlong flaming from the ethereal sky, With hideous ruin and combustion, down To bottomless perdition, there to dwell In adamantine chains and penal fire, Who durst defy the Omnipotent to arms.
Page 382 - O Prince, O Chief of many throned powers, That led the embattled seraphim to war Under thy conduct, and, in dreadful deeds Fearless, endangered heaven's perpetual King, And put to proof his high supremacy, Whether upheld by strength or chance or fate ! Too well I see and rue the dire event, That with sad overthrow and foul defeat...
Page 462 - The case of Mr Wordsworth, we perceive, is now manifestly hopeless, and we give him up as altogether incurable, and beyond the power of criticism. We cannot, indeed, altogether omit taking precautions now and then against the spreading of the malady ; but for himself, though we shall watch the progress of his symptoms as a matter of professional curiosity and instruction, we really think it right not to harass him...

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