An Analytical Inquiry Into the Principles of Taste

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T. Payne, 1808 - Aesthetics - 476 pages

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Contents

Mr Humes Opinion considered
10
Sexual Tastes of Brutes
11
Double Meaning of the word Taste
12
Various Pleasures of Cessation or inverted
13
Sculpture compared with Painting
14
Poetry with Music
15
Articulate Language and inarticulate Notes
16
Idiom in Language Rhythm Prosody
17
Mixed Qualities and Sensationshow separated
18
p
19
Grottesques
20
Its Organs 2 Primary or simple Sensation 3 Variation
21
Irritation
22
Mr Burkes System compared with that of Sir Joshua Reynolds
23
Illustrated by Examples of the Temples of Vesta and Indian Domes
24
The latter further examined MentalSympathies
25
Beauties of Colour and Form in Animals Ap propriated Beauties of particular Kinds de pending on Habit Irregularity
26
Sexual Predilectionstheir Influence and Ef fects
27
Force of Lightas reflected
28
As acting directly upon the eye Mr Burkes Error
29
Darkness Mr Burkes Notion of it examined
30
Other Privations compared with
31
Difficulty of considering Sensation alone
32
Particularly in Vision
33
Progress of Perception
34
Its Effect in reducing the Pleasures of Sense
35
Its Principles
36
Buildings of the Goths Celts Scandinavians c
37
When employed in Houses and Villas
38
Rise and Progress of Monastic or Cathedral Gothic
39
Sacred Architecture of the Greeks and Romans
40
Improperly copied and applied to Houses
41
In Decorations of Grounds
42
Ancient Coins c why interesting
43
Symmetryin Animals
44
In different Individuals 6 Mixed Flavours 7 8 Vitiated and morbid Palates 9 Their Pleasures and Habits
45
Its Reasons
46
Its Origin and Progress
47
Refinement and Excessopposed to the Gothic
48
Principle of Contrast 49 Scale by which the Eye measures
49
Consequent Effects of Proportion in St Peters
50
And of Contrast in Gothic Cathedrals
51
Of Intricacy and Extent
52
Lightness in Sculpture and Building
53
Errors of Imitation in Principles
54
Lightness in Painting Flowing Lines Rubens
55
Corregio
56
Sexual Beautymits Principle
57
Sudden Love
58
Love as existing among civilized and savage Men and brute Animals comparatively con sidered
59
Power of Imagination
60
Sensual and Social or Sentimental Love
61
Metaphysical Love Petrarch Cowley Waller
62
His Progressive Scale of the Sublime
63
Contrary in its Principles to the System of Lon ginus and all others known
64
Pastoral Love in Theocritus
65
Forms appropriate to Sculpture
66
Sculpturesque
67
Grottesque
68
Other distinct Characters
69
Classical
70
Romantic
71
His general Mistake of Ideas for Things
80
Deceptions of Sexual and Social Sympathies Mistatement
81
Regularity and Irregularity in Features
82
Ease Grace Elegance and Dignity of Gesture and Attitude
83
Belong to Character and Expression and not to particular Lines and Forms
84
In inanimate as well as animal Bodies
85
Dignity and Elegance wherein different
86
Dancing
87
Grace of Savages
88
Of the Greeks
89
go Where really so faulty Instance 91 Influence of Authority
91
Spiral Columns scooped Pediments
92
In Gardening
93
Clumps and Canals Terraces and Borders
94
Composition in Houses Offices and Plantations
95
Hanging Terraces
96
Irregularity in Architecture
97
Exemplified
98
p
99
In Lodges Cottages Gateways
101
Situations
102
Sir John Vanbrugh
103
Mr Brown
104
Made Water
105
Walks
106
Smallness of Size
107
In Women In Animals or other Objects
108
Gradual Diminution or Tapering
109
General Rules
110
In Morals
111
Artificial Perceptionhow far independent of organic Sensation
112
Their Effects
113
Whether negative or affirmative
114
In Taste and Manners
115
Academies their Effect on
116
Accounted
117
Mechanical and liberal Arts their Difference
118
Feeling Sentiment and Science in Painting
119
In Sculpture
120
Public Schools of Rhetoric their Effect on the Latin Language
121
Freedom of Study its Effect on the Greek
122
On the English 124 Instanced in Dr Blairs Criticism on a Passage of Pope
123
Criticism examined
125
The Passage justified by others from Euripides and Shakespeare
126
Theoretical Criticism in general
127
Its Causes
149
tion
152
Imitative
155
Visible Magnitude
197
Attitudes
210
14 In Buildings Gardens Pieces of Water
218
OF JUDGMENT
263
Judgment in what it consists 2 Reason as applied to Taste 3 Demonstration and Analogy 4 Laws of Nature 5 In Matters of Demonstration in Matters ...
265
Csar
272
Achilles
273
Probability in Epic Fiction 11 In Dramatic
298
Michel Angelo
302
OF THE PASSIONS p
320
Sympathy
333
Oratory 14 Acting
337
Epic and Dramatic License in Fiction their Difference
338
4 Examined as to 5 Fiction and Reality 6 Degrees of Sympathy Romans Asiatics 7 Sympathies with Exertion not with Suffering please
455

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Page 404 - Thy son is gone; he rests among the dead. The swarm that in thy noon-tide beam were born ? Gone to salute the rising morn.
Page 364 - Millions of Spirits for his fault amerced* Of Heaven, and from eternal splendours flung For his revolt; yet faithful how they stood, Their glory withered: as when Heaven's fire Hath scathed the forest oaks, or mountain pines, With singed top their stately growth though bare Stands on the blasted heath.
Page 9 - I do not know whether I am singular in my opinion: but for my own part, I would rather look upon a tree in all its luxuriancy and diffusion of boughs and branches, than when it is thus cut and trimmed into a mathematical figure; and can not but fancy, that an orchard in flower looks infinitely more delightful than all the little labyrinths of the most finished parterre.
Page 378 - Whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger, that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime; that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling.
Page 404 - Mighty victor, mighty lord ! Low on his funeral couch he lies ! No pitying heart, no eye, afford A tear to grace his obsequies.
Page 364 - Archangel ; but his face Deep scars of thunder had intrenched, and care Sat on his faded cheek ; but under brows Of dauntless courage, and considerate pride Waiting revenge. Cruel his eye, but cast Signs of remorse and passion, to behold The fellows of his crime, the followers rather (Far other once beheld in bliss), condemned For ever now to have their lot in pain...
Page 364 - Shorn of his Beams ; or from behind the moon, In dim eclipse, disastrous twilight sheds On half the nations, and with fear of change Perplexes...
Page 360 - Pierre, whene'er thou seest my fears Betray me less, to rip this heart of mine Out of my breast, and show it for a coward's.
Page 16 - To seek the real beauty, or real deformity, is as fruitless an enquiry, as to pretend to ascertain the real sweet or real bitter. According to the disposition of the organs, the same object may be both sweet and bitter; and the proverb has justly determined it to be fruitless to dispute concerning tastes.
Page 129 - And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.

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