Histoire de la littérature anglaise, Volume 1

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Page 289 - I never heard the old song of Percy and Douglas that I found not my heart moved more than with a trumpet; and yet it is sung but by some blind crowder, with no rougher voice than rude style; which being so evil apparelled in the dust and cobwebs of that uncivil age, what would it work, trimmed in the gorgeous eloquence of Pindar?
Page 361 - WHY so pale and wan, fond lover? Prithee, why so pale? Will, when looking well can't move her, Looking ill prevail? Prithee, why so pale? Why so dull and mute, young sinner?
Page 391 - ... a couch, whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit; or a terrace, for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect; or a tower of state, for a proud mind to raise itself upon; or a fort or commanding ground, for strife and contention; or a shop, for profit or sale; and not a rich storehouse, for the glory of the Creator and the relief of man's estate.
Page 386 - Lucina of life, and even pagans could doubt, whether thus to live, were to die; since our longest sun sets at right descensions, and makes but winter arches, and therefore it cannot be long before we lie down in darkness, and have our light in ashes...
Page 214 - And sikerly she was of greet desport, And ful plesaunt and amyable of port, And peyned hire to countrefete cheere Of Court, and been estatlich of manere, And to ben holden digne of reverence.
Page 211 - SQUIER, A lover, and a lusty bacheler, With lockes crull as they were laide in presse. Of twenty yere of age he was I gesse. Of his stature he was of even lengthe, And wonderly deliver, and grete of strengthe.
Page 311 - And I will make thee beds of roses And a thousand fragrant posies, A cap of flowers and a kirtle Embroider'd all with leaves of myrtle.
Page 46 - Telle me semble la vie des hommes sur cette terre, et son cours d'un moment, comparé à la longueur du temps qui la précède et qui la suit. Ce temps est ténébreux et incommode pour nous; il nous tourmente par...
Page 138 - Robin raged like a wild boar, As soon as he saw his own blood ; Then Bland was in hast, he laid on so fast, As though he had been cleaving of wood. And about, and about, and about they went, Like two wild bores in a chase ; Striving to aim each other to maim, Leg, arm, or any other place.
Page xv - Que les faits soient physiques ou moraux, il n'importe, ils ont toujours des causes. Il y en a pour l'ambition, pour le courage, pour la véracité, comme pour la digestion, pour le mouvement musculaire, pour la chaleur animale. Le vice et la vertu sont des produits comme le vitriol et comme le sucre ..." phrase saisissante et que le chef futur du naturalisme, alors à ses débuts, M.

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