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veu mur or Troy, u like a dastard I should skulk apart From battle. Nor to this my own free mind Prompts me; for I was train'd from earliest years To a brave spirit; and have learn'd to tight Still in the Trojan van, and still maintain My country's mighty honor und my own. I know too well, and in my heart and soul I feel the deep conviction, that a time Will come when sacred Troy shall be no more, But Priam and his people be destroy'd

From off the face of earth. The after-woo JUNE, 1844. 10

spund again these gentle words : Noblest of women ! do not grieve me thus; Against concurring Fate no mortal man can send me to the grave; and this I say, That none who once has breath'd the breath of life, Coward or brave, can hope to shun his fate; But hie thee to thy mansion, that thy works, The loom and distaff, may engage thy thoughts. Go task thy maidens. War must be the care, And mine the chief, of every man of Troy."

The noble Hector said, and raised from earth His horse-hair-crested helm. With homeward step His dear wife parted froin him, and turn'd back Her eyes, the fast tears trickling down her cheek.

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THE

ECLECTIC MAGAZINE

OF

FOREIGN LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND ART. ,

JUNE, 184 4.

PARTING OF HECTOR AND ANDROMACHE.

Forth Sprang Hector from the mansion, and trod back His footsteps through the stately rows of streets. Crossing the spacious city, he now reach'd The Scæan gates ; through them his passage lay. Forth to the field. But then his high-dower'd wife Came running on his steps ; Andromache, Æetion's daughter; who in woody tracts Of Hypoplacian Thebes once stretch'd his sway O'er the Cilicians. So his daughter lived, The bride of Hector with the brazen helm; Who now came running on his steps; while close The handmaid follow'd her, and at her breast The babe, as yet a tender innocent, Durling of Hector, fair as any star, Whom Hector nam'd Scamandrius; they of Troy, Astyanax ; since Hector was alone Their city's safeguard. He, on their approach, Casting a look upon his infant boy, Silently smiled. Andromache, all bathed In tears, stood by ; and, clinging to his hand, Address'd him : * Noblé husband! thy great heart Will sure destroy thee. Thou no pity hast For this thy infant son and wretched me, Whom thou wilt leave a widow. For the Greeks Will slay thee soon with overpowering charge Of numbers. It were better far that I, Once reft of thee, should sink within the grave. I have no other comfort when thy life Has yielded to its destiny; but grief Must be my portion. Father have I none, Nor mother. Thou, Hector, art my father! thou to me Art mother, brother, all my joy of life, My husband! Come, be merciful, remain Here in this turret; make not this child An orphan, nor a widow of thy wife. Command the Trojan army to a halt At the wild fig-tree, where the city lies Most easy of ascent, and most exposed The rampart to assault. Already thrice The bravest of their warriors have essay'd To force the wall; the famed Idomeneus, And either Ajax, and brave Diomed, And Atreus' sons: whether some skilful seer Have prophesied before them, or their minds Have prompted them spontaneous to the act.”

At these her words the lofty Hector shook His party-color'd horse-hair plume, and spoke : "Believe it, oh my wife! these same sad thoughts Have touch'd me nearly ; but I also fear The Trojans and the women fair of Troy, If like a dastard I should skulk apart From battle. Nor to this my own free mind Prompts me; for I was train's from earliest years To a brave spirit; and have learn'd to fight Still in the Trojan van, and still maintain My country's mighty honor and my own. I know too well, and in my heart and soul I feel the deep conviction, that a tim Will come when sacred Troy shall be no more, But Priarn and his people be destroy'd

From off the face of earth. The after-woe JUNE, 1844. 10

Of these my countrymen afflicts me not;
No, nor the grief of Hecuba's despair,
Nor kingly Priam's, nor the woeful lot
Of brethren, brave and many, who shall fall
Beneath their focs, as thine, Andromache!
When some stern Grecian with his mail of brass
Shall lead thee in thy tears away, and snatch
The light of freedom from thee: when, detain'd
At Argos, thou shalt weave the color'd web
Task'd by another, or sbalt waters bear
From fountains of llyperia, sore a verse
And faint, yet yielding to the hard control
That lays the burthen on thee. Haply then
Some påsser, looking on thy tears, may cry:
* This was the wife of Hector, who was once
Chief warrior of the Trojans when they fought
With their fam'd horses round the walls of Troy.'
So will he say: and thou wilt grieve afresh
At loss of him who might have warded off
Thy day of slavery. But may earth have heap'd
The bill upon my corse ere of thy cries
My ear be conscious, or my soul perceive
The leading of thy sad captivity."

So spake the noble Hector; and with hands'
Outstretch'd bent forward to embrace his child.
The babe against the damsel's broad-zoned breast
Lean'd backward, clinging with a cry, disturb'd
At his loved father's aspect, and in fear
Of the keen brass that glared upon his gaze,
And horse-hair sweeping crest that nodded fierce
Upon the helmet's cone. The father dear
And honor'd mother to each other laugh'd;
Instant the noble Hector from his head
Lifted the casque, and plac'd it on the ground,
Far-beaming where it stood ; then kisa'd his boy,
And dandled in his arms; imploring thug
Jove, and the other Deities of heaven:
“Hear, Jupiter, and every God on high!
Grant this may come to pass ! that he, my son,
May shine among the Trojans in renown
And strength as I myself, and reign o'er Troy
In valor: that of him it may be said
By one who sees him coming from the field,
"Truly the son transcends the father's deeds!'
Grant him to slay his enemy, and bear
The bloody trophy back and glad the heart
Of this his mother!" So he said, and placed
The babe within his own beloved's arms :
She softly laid him on her balmy breast,
Smiling through tears. The husband at that sight
Melted in pity; with his hand he smooth'd
Her cheek, and spoke again these gentle words :
“ Noblest of women ! do not grieve me thus ;
Against concurring Fate no mortal man
Can send me to the grave; and this I say,
That none who once has breath'd the breath of life,
Coward or brave, can hope to shun his fate;
But hie thee to thy mansion, that thy works,
The loom and distaff, may engage thy thoughts.
Go task thy maidens. War must be the care,
And mine the chief, of every man of Troy."

The noble Hector said, and raised from earth His horse-hair-crested helm. With homeward step His dear wife parted from him, and turn'd back Her eyes, the fast tears trickling down her cheek.

PENNY POSTAGE AND THE POST OFFICF. (child in the kingdom enjoys a practical freeFrom the British Foreign Review.

dom of correspondence, next in value to the

liberiy of speech, but the act is attended 1. Report from the Select Committee on Post with the necessary incompleteness of his

age, together with the Minutes of Evidence, plan, whereby it can be shown that the public Appendir, and Index.

Ordered by the lireasury is mulcted of an immense revenue, House of Commens to be printed, Aug. and the public despoiled ot' innumerable con14th, 1843.

veniences. 2. The State and Prospects of Penny Post- Reduction of postage, uniformity of charge, age, as developed in the Evidence taken be

prepayment and use of stamps, were doubtfore the Postage Committee of 1843, with less essential features of Mr. Hill's plan, but incidental remarks on the Testimony of the they were far from being the whole : from Post-Office Authorities, and an Appendix first to last Mr. Hill has professed that they of Correspondence. By RowLAND Hull. formed but a portion of it. Increased speed London : Charles Knight and Co., 1844.

in the delivery of letters, greater facilities for When the bill on Penny Postage was un- their despatch, simplification in the operader discussion in the House of Lords, the lions of the Post-Office, were parts, though Duke of Wellington bore testimony to the less novel and less obvious, no less necessary. superior merits of Mr. Rowland Hill's plan" Reduction, increased convenience and ecoover any other. Though opposed to the re- nomy,” as Sir Thomas Wilde observed, duction of postage, as inopportune at that were all to be taken together," and he proparticular time, his Grace advised the passing ceeded to say that the removal of Mr. Hill of that bill on the express ground that it ena- showed that the plan was intended to be bled the Government to carry out Mr. Hill's given up. “ The dismissal of Mr. Hill was plan. The Treasury, he argued, have al- the knell of the plan.” Almost with the ready sufficient powers to reduce postage to voice of a prophet, Mr. Matthew Hill foreany extent they please, and they are evidently told three years and a half ago, before his not very scrupulous about the matter ;-they brother entered the service of the Treasury, may give up the whole postage revenue with--that the very parts of the plan now left out asking their lordships' leave,-they can untouched were those surrounded with the do this mischief, but they cannot give effect greatest difficulties of execution. He said, to Mr. Hill's plan without new powers; he therefore recommended the passing of the “ The reduction of postage and the modes of bill, because it conferred those powers. prepayment are no doubt the principal features “For," to use the Duke's own words, “ I am

of your plan ; but you lay great stress, and very disposed to admit that the plan called Mr. cilities for transmitting letters; and this part of

properly in my opinion, on increasing the faRowland Hill's plan is, if it were adopted ex- the reform will, I apprehend, cause you more actly as was proposed, of all the plans that labor of detail than that which more strikes the which is most likely to be successful.” But public eye. In this department you will be left the Duke's sound opinion, which is recorded to contend with the Post-Office almost unaided. It in Hansard of the 5th of August, 1839, does will be very easy to raise plausible objections to not seem to have had much weight with any be supposed to be competent judges, either in

your measures, of which ministers can hardly member of the administration to which his respect of technical information or of leisure for Grace belongs. It is set at nought by the inquiry.” prime minister, passed over by the Chancellor of the Exchequer, ridiculed by the Post- The prediction has been only too well fulmaster-General, and scorned by every one of filled. his officers, from the secretary to the letter- Four years ago we argued for the adoption carrier. All are in league, not only to pre- of the Penny Postage, and a few months vent the adoption of Mr. Hill's plan exactly brought about the desired event. We have as was proposed, but even half of Mr. Hill's now to advocate its completion, and with an plan. It is hardly necessary to say that they equal confidence as to the result of our laare working to retard its success, and to ful- bors, though the advent may not be quite so fil their official predictions of its failure. soon at hand as before.

Bad it is for Mr. Hill, worse for the rev- Before we proceed to describe the portions enue, still worse for the good and conven- of the plan remaining incomplete, sometbing ience of the public, that the Duke's opinion should be said of what has been carried into should have failed to weigh with his fellow- execution and of the results. A Select Comministers. The dismissal of Mr. Hill is not mittee of the House of Commons, on the merely unjust to an individual through whose motion of Sir Thomas Wilde, was appointed exertions almost every man, woman, and in the last session of parliament, to inquire

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