Black's Tourist's Guide to Wales

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A. and C. Black, 1877 - 90 pages
 

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Page 85 - The roof is gone: but the walls, and pillars, and abutments, which supported it, are entire. A few of the pillars indeed have given way; and here and there, a piece of the facing of the wall: but in correspondent parts, one always remains to tell the story.
Page 24 - ... easily and so constantly passed by every kind of vehicle, as to discharge from the mind of the traveller every idea of danger, and even of difficulty, and to leave him at liberty, in the utmost tranquillity and composure, to contemplate the majestic and sublime objects amidst which he is conveyed. The precipitous and craggy sides of the noble mountains, in some parts of basaltic formation, press closely on each other, and shut in the narrow pass. Shattered masses of every form, which have been...
Page 24 - ... whence, and from the ridge, the view is really nobler than from the summit, because the neighbouring mountains are seen in nobler proportion.' " In Wordsworth's Prelude, at the commencement of the last Book (p. 353), a moonlight night on the top of Snowdon is described with great beauty of language. The geological character of Snowdon is peculiar and of great interest ; and for the researches of the botanist it affords an extensive and most productive field. Snowdon was formerly a " royal forest,"...
Page 52 - With the woman one loves, with the friend of one's heart, and a good study of books, (says Lord Lyttleton to his friend Mr. Bower,) one might pass an age in this vale, and think it a day.
Page 33 - Lleyn, and the entire island of Anglesey, with the surrounding ocean. Pennant says truly of the Glyder Fawr, " The elements seem to have warred against this mountain ; rains have washed away the soil, lightnings have rent its surface, and the winds make it the constant object of their fury.
Page 52 - The upper one rushes over three projections of dark rocks, which rise like steps one above another, into a deep black basin, rendered still darker by the shadowing precipices, intermingled with huge, protruding, stony masses ; while the darkness and solitude of the place are increased by the sadcoloured foliage of the trees overhanging the rapid stream from each of its banks. A few yards lower down, a bold columnar rock, called Hugh Lloyd's Pulpit,* rises from the bed of the river ; passing which...
Page 25 - Inn of Pen-y-gwryd. From this junction Capel Curig is distant about 4 miles. The route to Beddgelert takes a sharp turn to the right, and quickly enters NANT GWYNANT, or the Vale of Waters, " the scene of many a bloody skirmish in the time of Edward IV., between William Earl of Pembroke, and the Welsh Lancastrians under Jevanap-Robert." A well-formed road, traversing a rich valley in a course parallel with the river (though at a considerable elevation above it), and overlooking the Lake Gwynant,...
Page 26 - ... besmeared with blood, he became alarmed, and, rushing to the house, he found his infant's cradle overturned, and the ground about it bloody. Rashly concluding that the hound had killed his child, he drew his sword and slew the poor animal, heedless of his caresses. Afterwards, on removing the cradle, he found beneath it his child, unhurt, and sleeping by the side of a dead wolf. The truth was at once apparent. During the absence of the family, a wolf had entered the house, and had been destroyed...
Page 46 - Vychan," with a lion on his breast, and with a dog at his feet, representing an ancestor of the family of Vaughan of Nannau ; and there have been recently erected handsome monuments in memory of Baron Richards, who was a native of this place, and of the Rev. John Jones, Archdeacon of Merioneth. At the decease of a parishioner a singular custom, which is now, however, abolished, used to be observed here ; a metal plate, resembling what is usually affixed to a coffin, inscribed with the name of the...
Page 38 - ... here, and remained two or three nights, after his retreat from Chester. In 1646 the castle was valiantly defended for the King by Col. William Salusbury, but was finally surrendered to the Parliamentary army under Gen. Mytton. At the Restoration it was demolished. The ruins of this venerable structure are extensive, covering the summit of the craggy hill, one side of which is boldly precipitous. The walls are of singular construction, having been grouted, or formed of two thick parallel walls,...

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