The Dublin society's weekly observations

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 197 - ... part of the cost, though the wages of every man were equal. The reduction of the price of the manufacture would increase the demand of it, all the same...
Page 197 - The same rule will hold in the clothing, the shipping, and all other trades whatsoever. And thus an addition of hands to our manufactures will only reduce the price of them ; the labourer will...
Page 27 - Flefh Meat, might be comfortably fupplied for a whole Year, with as much Beef and Butter as has been exported to purchafe a Head-drefs for a Lady. If this be the Effect of Trade, we fhall be undone by Trading.
Page 198 - Shipping, and all other Trades whatfoever. And thus an Addition of Hands to our Manufactures will only reduce the Price of them ; the Labourer will ftill have as much Wages, and will confequently be enabled to purchafe more Conveniencies of Life ; fo that every Intereft in the Nation would receive a Benefit from the Increafe of our Working People.
Page 125 - Direction., and applied wherever a Trench or Hole of any Size is to be cut out in a Bog. By this Means, the Charge of Digging is made up to the Farmer in good Turf, and the Labour pays itfelf. ' In cutting your Trench, be careful to leave a Gun on each Side of your Plot : This, is a Piece of Bog uncut...
Page 123 - Hops, and therefore can* not join in calling them unprofitable ; ' but iince they are generally fo efteemed, ' and accordingly neglected, it will be of •* equal Service to my Country, to promote the Culture of them under Hops, as if * they were really fo. * As one Letter cannot contain all I * have to fay upon this Subject, you'll give * me Leave, Gentlemen, to confine...
Page 56 - To examine its oylinefs, he throws a Quantity into the Fire, if it blaze foon, and crackle much, he thinks he may depend upon it. After all, he...
Page 153 - tis from them either single or mix'd together, that the greatest improvements on our Ciders must at present be expected. A few years hence we shall be able to acid to these the Stire, Foxwhelp, Woodcock, Whitfoot, and Underleaf, lately propagated here from England, and in great Reputation there." The next authority I shall quote is " J. Worlidge, Gent," whose book was " Printed for Thomas Dring, over against the Inner Temple Gate in Fleet Street, 1691.
Page 134 - Reader without obferving to him, that it were to be wifh'd many Gentlemen would employ their leifure Hours in the Country, in the Way of our ingenious Correfpondent in making Experiments, and attempting new Improvements. That, in which he has fucceeded, was certainly as unpromifing as any other, and affords Encouragement to explore more of thofe untrodden paths which we find lead to private Profit and to publick Wealth.
Page 40 - A Stone of Flax, the Original Price of which, before it has undergone any Change from Labour, is only Two and Six-pence, may be drawn into Threads of different Finenefles gradually encreafing in Value from one Penny to four Pounds an Ounce...

Bibliographic information