Neuroanatomy for the Neuroscientist

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, May 30, 2008 - Medical - 500 pages

In this day where research grants are the primary focus, many young investigators are thrown into neurosciences courses without any prior preparation in neuroanatomy. This book is designed to help prepare them by introducing many of the fundamentals of the nervous system. It represents the essentials of an upper level biology course on the central nervous system. It is not designed to be a clinical approach to the nervous system, but rather it approaches the nervous system from a basic science perspective that intertwines both structure and function as an organizing teaching and learning model. Medical and dental examples are included but the main focus is on neuroscience.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Jacobson_Ch02pdf
23
Jacobson_Ch03pdf
55
Jacobson_Ch04pdf
84
Jacobson_Ch05pdf
121
Jacobson_Ch06pdf
147
Jacobson_Ch07pdf
165
Jacobson_Ch08pdf
188
Jacobson_Ch09pdf
218
Jacobson_Ch13pdf
311
Jacobson_Ch14pdf
337
Jacobson_Ch15pdf
374
Jacobson_Ch16pdf
396
Jacobson_Ch17pdf
409
Jacobson_Ch18pdf
434
Jacobson_Biblopdf
449
Jacobson_Indexpdf
487

Jacobson_Ch10pdf
249
Jacobson_Ch11pdf
273
Jacobson_Ch12pdf
293
Jacobson_BMpdf
499
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 470 - Case of tumour of the right temporosphenoidal lobe, bearing on the localisation of the sense of smell and on the interpretation of a particular variety of epilepsy.
Page 463 - The inheritance of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome and associated behaviors. Evidence for autosomal dominant transmission.
Page 481 - Inhibitory and excitatory interhemispheric transfers between motor cortical areas in normal humans and patients with abnormalities of the corpus callosum. Brain 118: 429-440 93.
Page 473 - Leavitt. 1974. Human memory and the cholinergic system. A relationship to aging? Arch Neurol 30(2):1 13-121.
Page 458 - Symptomatic occult hydrocephalus with "normal" cerebrospinal fluid pressure: a treatable syndrome. N Engl J Med.

Bibliographic information