The Absent Shakespeare

Front Cover
Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 1994 - Literary Criticism - 174 pages
The Absent Shakespeare challenges the notion that Shakespeare is "faceless" in his plays. It opposes Borges's notion of Shakespeare as "no one . . . a bit of coldness," a Shakespeare who constructed a mythology based on "his own intense private life."
Building on recent textual studies of King Lear and Hamlet, which compare Folio and Quarto differences, Mirsky sees them not just as an opportunity to view the playwright revising toward more skillful staging, greater complexity of plot, and ambiguity of character. The process of revision also exposes a personal Shakespeare. Differences between Folio and Quarto texts show the growing sophistication of Shakespeare's dramatic craft and reveal how the playwright changed as he matured. The book presents a dramatist maturing in time, grappling with incest, patricide, filicide, erotic love, and the inevitability of death. It finds this naked Shakespeare in Macbeth and The Tempest as well, expressed in the riddles of the plays. The author refers not only to the text of Shakespeare but also to the plays in performance - suggesting how the actor's reading and interpretation lay bare the intentions of the playwright on the stage.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

pages 114,115 are important to me

Contents

The Absent Shakespeare
15
All the Kings Daughters
19
The Itch Revises
33
Hamlets Father
47
The Shadows Dance
71
Macbeths Child
99
What Prospero Knows
125
Shakespeares Myth
141
Notes
147
Works Cited
169
Index
172
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 21 - Hear, Nature, hear ! dear goddess, hear ! Suspend thy purpose, if thou didst intend To make this creature fruitful ! Into her womb convey sterility ! Dry up in her the organs of increase, And from her derogate body never spring A babe to honour her...

References to this book

Bibliographic information