John Buncle, Junior, Gentleman, Volume 1

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J. Johnson, 1776
 

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Page 123 - And thick around the woodland hymns arise. Roused by the cock, the soon-clad shepherd leaves His mossy cottage, where with peace he dwells ; And from the crowded fold, in order, drives His flock, to taste the verdure of the morn.
Page 63 - And-flow'rs fpontaneous fpring before her, Where you and I all day might travel, And meet with nought but fand and gravel ; But poets have a piercing eye. And many pretty things can fpy, Which neither you nor I can fee, But then the fault's in you and me.
Page 72 - As I mention nothing of any children by so many wives, some readers may perhaps wonder at this, and therefore, to give a general answer, once for all, I think it sufficient to observe, that I had a great many, to carry on the succession ; but as they never were concerned in any extraordinary affairs, nor ever did any...
Page 201 - Nay, as to the matter of that, I think your great fokes ought to know better than to fet us together by the ears, to ferve their own turns.
Page 64 - I would earneltly recommend to thee, as the mod agreeable method of efcaping the thorns and briars of a troublefome world, which are fo apt to prick and tear every fenfible heart. But although my parents had thus phyfically united in my compofition their own oppofite excellencies, yet they both contributed towards forming me -of an amorous complexion ; for which...
Page 63 - Where you and I all day might travel, And meet with nought but fand and gravel." It muft be a matter of great indifference to the world, which of his Wives called me her Son, as they were all equally beautiful, and equally accomplifhed.
Page 65 - I advanced in years, my zeal for controverfy not only abated, hut was turned into difguft. This might, in part, be owing to that moderation of temper. I received from my mother ; and partly, to being wearied of thofe endlefs wranglings to which I was perpeperpetually witnels in my father's houie j and which, after the loft of much breath. and temper on each fide, ended...
Page 65 - ... would permit. But he thought it an article of the utmoft importance, to make me thoroughly acquainted with Polemical Divinity ; in which he was himfelf fo great an adept. When I was fcarcely twelve years of age. I was able to handle my weapons with fuch dexterity, that every Athanafian Combatant was afraid to enter the lift with me. My father triumphed in his fuccefs ^ and thanked Heaven that his darling fon promifed to be as great a champion for the truth as himfelf; Alas, good man, in this...
Page 64 - I have always found ipyfelf more difpofed to pity the errors, or fmile at the weaknefles of mankind, than to vex and irritate my foul about them..— *-and this, gentle reader, I would earneftly recommend to thee, as the mod agreeable method of efcaping the thorns and briars .of a troublefome world, which are fo apt to...
Page 65 - MY father took as much care of my education, as his paflion for rambling about in fearch of adventures would permit. But he thought it an article of the utmoft importance, to make me thoroughly acquainted with Polemical Divinity; in which he was himfelf fo great an adept. When I was fcarcely twelve years of age, I was able to handle my weapons with fuch dexterity, that every Athanafian Combatant was afraid to enter the lift with me. My father triumphed in his fuccefs ; and thanked Heaven that his...

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