Theory of Harmony

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1983 - Music - 440 pages
4 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
This book will come as a joy, a revelation, a warm reassurance. From this one book one might well learn less about harmony than about form, about aesthetics, even about life. Some will accuse Schoenberg of not concentrating on the topic at hand, but such an accusation, though well-founded, would miss the point of Theory of Harmony, because the heart and soul of the book is to be found in his vivid and penetrating digressions. They are the fascinating reflections of a great and humane musician who was a born writer as well. - from the book.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
User Review - Flag as inappropriate

good

Contents

PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION I
1
THEORY OR SYSTEM OF PRESENTATION?
7
THE METHOD OF TEACHING HARMONY
13
CONSONANCE AND DISSONANCE
19
Chords 89 Connection of Seventh Chords with One Another
92
CONNECTION OF CHORDS THAT HAVE
112
FREER TREATMENT OF VII IN MAJOR
146
RHYTHM TAKT AND HARMONY
202
MODULATION TO THE IInd Vth AND VIth
268
CHORALE HARMONIZATION
286
NONHARMONIC TONES
309
A FEW REMARKS CONCERNING NINTH
345
THE WHOLETONE SCALE AND RELATED
390
CHORDS CONSTRUCTED IN FOURTHS
399
AESTHETIC EVALUATION OF CHORDS WITH
411
APPENDIX
423

CONTINUATION
208
RELATIONSHIP TO THE MINOR SUB
222
AT THE FRONTIERS OF TONALITY More about
238

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1983)

An American of Austrian birth, Arnold Schoenberg composed initially in a highly developed romantic style but eventually turned to painting and expressionism. At first he was influenced by Richard Wagner and tried to write in a Wagnerian style. He attracted the attention of Alban Berg and Anton von Webern, with whom he created a new compositional method based on using all 12 half-steps in each octave as an organizing principle, the so-called 12-tone technique. His importance to the development of twentieth-century music is incredible, but the music he composed using this new method is not easily accessible to most concertgoers.

Bibliographic information