Subversive Horror Cinema: Countercultural Messages of Films from Frankenstein to the Present

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McFarland, Mar 20, 2014 - Performing Arts - 256 pages
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Horror cinema flourishes in times of ideological crisis and national trauma--the Great Depression, the Cold War, the Vietnam era, post-9/11--and this critical text argues that a succession of filmmakers working in horror--from James Whale to Jen and Sylvia Soska--have used the genre, and the shock value it affords, to challenge the status quo during these times. Spanning the decades from the 1930s onward it examines the work of producers and directors as varied as George A. Romero, Pete Walker, Michael Reeves, Herman Cohen, Wes Craven and Brian Yuzna and the ways in which films like Frankenstein (1931), Cat People (1942), The Woman (2011) and American Mary (2012) can be considered "subversive."
 

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Contents

Foreword by Jeff Lieberman
1
Preface
3
Introduction
5
Frankenstein 1931 and Freaks 1932
21
Cat People 1942 and The Curse of the Cat People 1944
43
The Films of Herman Cohen
62
The Films of Michael Reeves and Pete Walker
80
Night of the Living Dead 1968 Deathdream 1972 and The Crazies 1973
104
Shivers 1975 Blue Sunshine 1978 and Dawn of the Dead 1978
151
HenryPortrait of a Serial Killer 1986 and American Psycho 2000
163
Brian Yuzna and Splatstick
180
Teeth 2007 and American Mary 2012
197
AfterwordSubversive Horror Cinema Post911
211
Chapter Notes
225
Bibliography
234
Index
239

Last House on the Left 1972 and The Texas Chain Saw Massacre 1974
130

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About the author (2014)

Jon Towlson is a London-based journalist and film critic. He has written for Starburst Magazine, Paracinema, Exquisite Terror, Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies, Shadowland Magazine, Bright Lights Film Journal and Digital Film-maker Magazine.

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