Spunyarn from the Strands of a Sailor's Life Afloat and Ashore: Forty-seven Years Under the Ensigns of Great Britain and Turkey, Volume 1

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Hutchinson & Company, 1924 - Japan - 296 pages
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Page 55 - The first I became acquainted with belonged to a small variety. They were succeeded by a breed of long brown, evil-smelling things which apparently had swallowed up all their predecessors. They were so big on the wing that they afforded us much amusement in mimic sport. We shot them with miniature bows and arrows, and raced them as
Page 55 - The lamp would be turned down, and presently the cockroaches would begin to assemble. After a few minutes the lamp was turned up again. The quarry, dazzled by the sudden light and the strange noises we made to frighten them, would rise up to fly away to their hiding-places. Off flew our small arrows, and two or three would fall to lucky shots.
Page 194 - I wanted to do, and he willingly fitted me out with a portable dark-room and all the necessary gear and chemicals on condition that I handed over to him the plates of any photos I might be able to take. We left soon enough in the morning for His...
Page 73 - Down you go on your marrowbones," giving him a push forward. Over he went, and as he placed himself in the familiar nursery attitude for daddy to give baby a ride, I sprang upon his back, and began spurring him with my heels, whilst I beat him behind with an imaginary whip.
Page 29 - Why, Captain, you've got a very taut-rigged ship ; you spread a lot of canvas, and it seems to me you haven't got too many men on board to handle those sails. I'll tell you what I'll do. ... I have got a lot of lazy, fat-sterned fellows on board my ship. I'll lend you a few whilst we are together. It will do them good.' " ' But I guess I don't want any of your men, and then I'm going another way,
Page 109 - I resolved to pay the place a visit, and see if it was adapted for such s settlement. Port San Juan is almost opposite Cape Flattery, at the entrance to the Straits of San Juan de Fuca,and about sixty miles by sea from Victoria, BC The harbour is about a mile and a half wide at the entrance, and three deep, with an average of six fathoms of water.
Page 195 - ... dark chamber. This consisted of a large box with all the requisites, a folding table for it to stand upon, and a large square mantle of red cotton material to serve as a covering for the whole, and screen off all rays of light but those wanted for the production of the photograph.
Page 194 - No one knew his real origin, and no one troubled themselves about it. He spoke funny English, and it was an amusement to draw him into a long argument. His most usual expression of welcome was : " I am delight ! " He used it on every occasion.
Page 196 - I removed the cap cover and instantly half a dozen heads were striving to see what was inside the curious-looking machine on three outstretched legs. I felt a bit distressed over it, but I could not feel very angry, considering the bait I had offered to their evergrowing curiosity.
Page 196 - I got them also to arrange that portion of the crowd near us into two lines on each side, far enough apart to be out of the field of vision. I prepared another plate, and all went well until I had taken my shot and removed the

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