Memoir and Literary Remains of Lieutenant-General Sir Henry Edward Bunbury, Bart

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Spottiswoode & Company, printers, 1868 - Great Britain - 369 pages
 

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Page 206 - ... near unto them, for the repressing of seditions in their beginnings. For without that, there useth to be more trepidation in court upon the first breaking out of troubles than were fit. And the state runneth the danger of that which Tacitus saith ; Atque is habitus animorum fuit, ut pessimum facinus auderent pauci, plures vellent, omnes paterentur...
Page 300 - why should I not have gone to my father-in-law, or to the Emperor Alexander, who is my personal friend ? We have become enemies, because he wanted to annex Poland to his dominions, and my popularity among the Poles was in his way. But otherwise he was my friend, and he would not have treated me in this way.
Page 301 - I have been the greatest enemy of your country ; I have made war upon you for twenty years ; and I do you the highest honour, and give you the greatest proof of my confidence, by placing myself voluntarily in the hands of my most constant and inveterate enemies ! Remember what I have been, and how I stood among the sovereigns of Europe.
Page 298 - I am come to this country a passenger on board one of your ships of war after a previous negotiation with the Commander. If he had told me I was to be a prisoner I should not have come. I asked him if he was willing to receive me and my suite on board and to carry me to England.
Page 299 - ... sent thither, and I protest against being imprisoned in a fortress in this country. I demand to be received as an English citizen. I know, indeed, that I cannot be admitted to the rights of an Englishman at first. Some years are requisite to entitle one to be domiciliated.
Page 302 - Mine, to be sure,' he said with a smile, ' were rather on a small scale. I had six hundred soldiers, and he had two hundred thousand. At length I made war upon him, defeated him, and dethroned him. But there was nothing in this to deprive me of my rank as one of the sovereigns of Europe.
Page 297 - Buonaparte appeared not to hear distinctly, or not to comprehend ; and after a line or two had been read, he took the paper from Lord Keith's hands and proposed to me that I should translate. I believe he meant that I should make a written translation, but I preferred reading it aloud in French. " Napoleon listened attentively to the whole without interrupting me, and appeared as if he had been previously aware of what was to be communicated to him. At the conclusion, Lord Keith asked Buonaparte...
Page 297 - Buonaparte was alone in the inner cabin. We were announced, and were admitted immediately. After I had been introduced, and Buonaparte had put a few trivial questions, Lord Keith produced a copy of the letter from Lord Melville, containing the orders of His Majesty's Government, and tendered it to Buonaparte. He...
Page 300 - Russia, who is my personal friend ? We have become enemies because he wanted to annex Poland to his dominions — and my popularity among the Poles was in his way ; but otherwise he was my friend, and he would not have treated me in this manner. If your Government acts thus, it will disgrace itself in the eyes of Europe ; and even your own people will disapprove and blame its conduct. Besides, you do not know, perhaps, what a feeling my death will create both in France and Italy, and how greatly...
Page 302 - Bonaparte,' he added, pointing with his finger to the offensive epithet in Lord Melville's letter. ' I am Prince, or Consul, and ought to be treated as such, if treated with at all. When I was at Elba, I was at least as much a sovereign in that island as Louis on the throne of France. We had both our respective flags, our ships, our troops. Mine, to be sure,' he said with a smile, ' were rather on a small scale.

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