Legends of Connaught: Irish Stories ...

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John Cumming, 1839 - Tales - 405 pages
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Page 137 - King, his crown and dignity, and against the form of the statute in that case made and provided.
Page 1 - There was a laughing Devil in his sneer, That raised emotions both of rage and fear; And where his frown of hatred darkly fell, Hope withering fled, and Mercy sigh'd farewell!
Page 299 - Things are going on as ill and as irregularly as possible," said the old martinet ; " the French have got a young general who knows nothing of the regular rules of war ; he is sometimes on our front, sometimes on the flank, sometimes on the rear. There is no supporting such a gross violation of rules.
Page 137 - Labourer, not having the fear of God before their Eyes but being moved and Seduced by the instigation of the Devil...
Page 152 - I request of your lordship is, to give me the longest day possible, that I may be prepared to meet my God. However guilty I may be conceived within a narrow circle, I hope in a higher one the unprejudiced part of the world will think me innocent. Those who know me from my earliest life know me incapable of such an action. I never feared death, nor am I afraid to meet it in any shape, in the mos.t formidable, even an ignominious death. It may be thought I wish to solicit pardon. I would not accept...
Page 153 - Those who know me from my earliest life know me incapable of such an action. I never feared death, nor am I afraid to meet it in any shape, in the mos.t formidable, even an ignominious death. It may be thought I wish to solicit pardon. I would not accept" of pardon after being found guilty by such a jury, because I know I could not face the world after it. It has been suggested, and I understand the report prevails, that I wish for time in order to commit suicide. As a worldly man I never feared...
Page 143 - Sir Matthew Hale said it was better that nine guilty men should escape than that one innocent man should suffer. This maxim has been approved by all jurists and statesmen from that day to this. It was applied to a case of murder, where one man's life was on one side and the interest of an entire community on the other.
Page 150 - Unfortunate old man ! happy had it been for you that you never had known law at all, or that you had known it better. The unhappy gentleman who is now at your side would not have been brought to the wretched situation in which he now stands, or to the dreadful end which must now await him. Miserable man ! you are fallen a victim to your own subtleties, and become the dupe of your own cunning. The venerable appearance you have...
Page 152 - I beg leave to trouble your lordships with a few words. I shall be very short. I do not mean to cast blame anywhere. I accuse no one. From the evidence, the judges could have given no other charge : the jury could have found no other verdict. I think the verdict of the jury a just one, according to the evidence which was produced ; but I did not think such evidence could have been produced.
Page 356 - ... chairs, its massive fireplace of brawn-like marble, its impossible sideboard. Not yet had he accustomed himself to this room; each time he entered it he received a slight shock of surprise. Presently he heard Monica's father coming slowly and heavily downstairs. Martin passed into the hall. Symons was supported on one side by a stick and on the other by his man, Cubbins. Symons' large figure, dignified in spite of his feebleness and old age, .suggested a kind of timid and furtive friendliness.

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