The Edinburgh Gazetteer, Or Geographical Dictionary ...: Accompanied by an Atlas, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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A. Constable and Company, 1822 - Geography
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Page lvii - For some hours lightning is seen almost without intermission ; sometimes it only illuminates the sky, and shews the clouds near the horizon ; at others it discovers the distant hills, and again leaves all in darkness, when in an instant it re-appears in vivid and successive flashes, and exhibits the nearest objects in all the brightness of day. During all this time the distant thunder never ceases to roll, and is only silenced by some nearer peal, which bursts on the ear with such a sudden and tremendous...
Page lvii - It is attended by such a thunder-storm as can scarcely be imagined by those who have only seen that phenomenon in a temperate climate. It generally begins with violent blasts of wind, which are succeeded by floods of rain. For some hours lightning is seen almost without intermission ; sometimes it only illuminates the sky, and shows the clouds near the horizon ; at others it discovers the distant hills, and again leaves all in darkness, when in an instant it reappears in vivid and successive flashes,...
Page 177 - But their address in this rapid descent is truly wonderful ; for, in their swiftest motion, when they seem to have lost all government of themselves, they follow exactly the different windings of the road, as if they had previously settled in their minds the route they were to follow, and taken every precaution for their safety.
Page 178 - ... lop a few branches from the trees, with which they make a tent. In a few minutes this slight timber-work is divided into squares by the stalks of some climbing plant, or by the threads of the agave. The banana leaves having in the...
Page 454 - Shah it was conquered by the emperor Akbar, and continued subject to Delhi, or nominally so, till the year 1757, when it fell into the hands of the English, who have gradually changed its form of government, and introduced a code of regulations, founded on the Hindoo, Mohammedan and English laws, by which impartial justice is administered to all the inhabitants, and toleration granted to all religions, owing to which the country improves, and the population increases.
Page 453 - Ganges, the Brahmapootra, Dummooda, and several other rivers, so connected by various streams, and the annual inundations, that there is scarcely a town which does not enjoy the benefits of an inland navigation, the boats employed in which are of various sizes and shapes, many of them very handsome, and fitted both for convenience and state. The Delta of the Ganges, the water of which is either salt or brackish...
Page 202 - In the middle of the Falls stands a small island, about forty feet broad and somewhat longer, on which grow a few cragged hemlock and spruce trees, and about half way between this island and the eastern shore is a rock, lying at the very edge of the...
Page 177 - The mules themselves are sensible of the caution requisite in these descents; for, coming to the top of an eminence, they stop, and having placed their fore feet close together, as in a posture of stopping themselves, they also put their hinder feet together, but a little forwards, as if going to lie down. In this attitude, having as it were taken a survey of the road, they slide down with the swiftness of a meteor. All...
Page 148 - It is an amphibious animal, that is, it delights in low and marshy places, where it lies coiled up like a rope, and concealed under moss, rotten timber, and dried leaves, to seize its prey by surprise, which from its immense bulk it is not active enough to pursue. When hungry, it will devour any animal that comes within its reach, and is indifferent whether it is a sloth, a wild boar, a stag, or even a tiger; round which having twisted itself by the help of its claws, so that the creature cannot...
Page 177 - The oxen, which are the beasts of burden commonly made use of in this country, can scarcely force their way through these galleries, some of which are...

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