The history of Rome, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Richard Bentley, 1864 - Rome
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Page iv - Mommsen's work," as Dr. Schmitz remarks in the introduction, " though the production of a man of most profound and extensive learning and knowledge of the world, is not as much designed for the professional scholar as for intelligent readers of all classes who take an interest in the history of by-gone ages, and are inclined there to seek information that may guide them safely through the perplexing mazes of modern history.
Page 179 - bridge-makers" (pontifices) derived their name from their function, as sacred as it was politically important, of conducting the building and demolition of the bridge over the Tiber. They were the Roman engineers, who understood the mystery of measures and numbers: whence there devolved upon them also the duties of managing the calendar of the state, of proclaiming to the people the time of new and full moon, and the days of festivals, and of seeing that every religious and every judicial act took...
Page 31 - Resolutely, on the other hand, the Italian surrendered his own personal will for the sake of freedom, and learned to obey his father that he might know how to obey the state.
Page 28 - It was in another fashion, but not less strongly, that the deeply implanted religious feeling of the Italian race manifested itself; it held firmly by the idea, and did not suffer the form to obscure it. As the Greek, when he sacrificed, raised his eyes to heaven, so the Roman veiled his head ; for the prayer of the former was vision, that of the latter reflection.
Page 49 - Romilii, the chief probably of all the Roman clans, was settled in this very quarter ; the Janiculum formed a part of the city itself, and Ostia was a burgess colony or, in other words, a suburb. This cannot have been the result of mere accident. The Tiber was the natural highway for the traffic of Latium ; and its mouth, on a coast scantily provided with harbors, became necessarily the anchorage of seafarers. Moreover, the Tiber formed from very ancient times the frontier defense of the Latin stock...
Page 47 - ... to it ; besides which, it must not be forgotten that at the time when the Tities settled beside the Ramnians, Latin nationality rested on Latium as its basis, and not on Rome. The new tripartite Roman commonwealth was, notwithstanding some elements which, it is possible, were originally Sabellian, just what the community of the Ramnians had previously been, a portion of the Latin nation.
Page 181 - The profound and fearful idea of substitution also meets us here: when the gods of the community were angry and nobody could be laid hold of as definitely guilty, the.y might be appeased by one who voluntarily gave himself up...
Page 463 - ... for the efficient repair of the network of drains small and large by which Rome was pervaded, as well as of the public buildings and places ; for the proper cleansing and paving of the streets ; for preventing the nuisances of ruinous buildings, dangerous animals, or foul smells ; for the removing of waggons from the highway except during the hours of evening and night, and generally for the keeping open of the communication ; for the uninterrupted supply of the market of the capital with good...
Page 47 - Kome was not built in a day. But the serious consideration of the historian may well be directed to the inquiry in what way Rome could so early attain that prominent political position which it held in Latium, so different from what the physical character of the locality would have led us to anticipate. The site of Rome is less healthy and less fertile than that of most of the old Latin towns.
Page 280 - Anio, where it occupied a hill and threatened to establish in this, the most fertile part of the Roman territory, a new plebeian city. This secession showed in a palpable manner, even to the most obstinate of the oppressors, that such a civil war must, end with economic ruin to themselves also, and the senate gave way. The dictator negotiated an agreement ; the citizens returned within the city walls ; unity was outwardly restored.

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The History of Rome, by Theodor Mommsen Book I Chapter 7 Notes
The History of Rome, by Theodor Mommsen Book I Chapter 3 Notes · The History of Rome, by Theodor Mommsen Book I Chapter 5 Notes · The History of Rome, ...
ancienthistory.about.com/ library/ bl/ bl_text_mommsen_1_7n.htm

NEW PUBLICATIONS.; THE HISTORY OF ROME. BY THEORDOR MOMMSEN ...
In reproducing in America Dr. DICKSON'S translation of MOMMSEN'S Roman History, Messrs. SCRIBNER have done a very important service to the cause of ...
query.nytimes.com/ gst/ abstract.html?res=F7091FF7345C137B93C3AB1789D85F448784F9

The History of Rome, or “Römische Geschichte” (work by Mommsen ...
German historian and writer, famous for his masterpiece, Römische Geschichte (The History of Rome). He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1902. ...
www.britannica.com/ eb/ topic-267735/ The-History-of-Rome

History of Rome (Mommsen) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It was originally intended to be in five volumes spanning the history of Rome from its inception to the emperor Diocletian. The first three volumes, ...
en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/ History_of_Rome_(Mommsen)

The History of Rome/Book 1/Chapter 1 - Wikisource
The History of Rome/Book 1/Chapter 1. From Wikisource. < The History of Rome | Book 1. Jump to: navigation, search. The History of Rome Book 1 Chapter 1 ...
en.wikisource.org/ wiki/ The_History_of_Rome/ Book_1/ Chapter_1

Meta Search - Web Search for "The History of Rome" by Theodor ...
Advanced Search : The History of Rome" by Theodor Mommsen - From The Union of Italy To The Subjugation of Carthage and the Greek States ...
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The History of Rome, Book II From the Abolition of the Monarchy in ...
THE HISTORY OF ROME, BOOK II From the Abolition of the Monarchy in Rome to the Union of Italy by THEODOR MOMMSEN Translated with the Sanction of the Author ...
m.wattpad.com/ preview?id=13907& m=1

Theodor Mommsen History of Rome - The Revolution
The History Of Rome. Book Fourth The Revolution. By Theodor Mommsen. Translated With The Sanction Of The Author. By William Purdie Dickson, dd, LL.D. ...
italian.classic-literature.co.uk/ history-of-rome/ 04-the-revolution/

The History of Rome, by Theodor Mommsen | HISTORION
The History of Rome, by Theodor Mommsen. Translated with the sanction of the author by William Purdie Dickson. Preparer's Note. Preface by the Translator. ...
historion.net/ mommsen-history-rome/ index.html

The History of Rome, Book II by Theodor Mommsen - Project Gutenberg
Download the free ebook: The History of Rome, Book II by Theodor Mommsen.
www.gutenberg.org/ etext/ 10702

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