An Atlas Of Irish History

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Taylor & Francis Group, 2005 - History - 299 pages
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Combining over 100 beautifully crafted maps, charts and graphs with a narrative packed with facts and information, An Atlas of Irish History provides coverage of the main political, military, economic, religious and social changes that have occurred in Ireland and among the Irish abroad over the past two millennia.

Ruth Dudley Edwards and Bridget Hourican use the combination of thematic narrative and visual aids to examine and illustrate issues such as:

  • the Viking invasions of Ireland
  • the Irish in Britain
  • pre- and post-famine agriculture
  • population change
  • twentieth-century political affiliations.

This third edition has been comprehensively revised and updated to include coverage of the many changes that have occurred in Ireland and among its people overseas. Taking into consideration the main issues that have developed since 1981, and adding a number of new maps and graphs, this new edition also includes an informative and detailed section on the troubles that have been a feature of Irish life since 1969.

An Atlas of Irish History is an invaluable resource for students of Irish history and politics and the general reader alike.

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About the author (2005)

Since 1993 Ruth has written seriously and/or frivolously for almost every national newspaper in the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom and appears frequently on radio and television in Ireland, the UK and on the BBC World Service. Ruth feels both Irish and English and greatly enjoys being part of both cultures. The Anglo-Irish Murders, her ninth crime novel, is a satire on the peace process. Three times a bridesmaid, she has been shortlisted by the Crime Writers Association for the John Creasey Award for the best first novel and twice for the Last Laugh award for the funniest crime novel of the year.

Bridget Hourican is a freelance journalist and historian. She is literary editor of The Dubliner magazine and a regular contributor to the Irish Times book pages and to magazines such as Image. She wrote over 400 entries for the recently published Dictionary of Irish Biography.

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